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Navy and black bean-based dog foods are digestible during weight loss in overweight and obese adult companion dogs

  • Genevieve M. Forster (a1), Nora Jean Nealon (a2), Dale Hill (a3), Tracey D. Jensen (a4), Teva L. Stone (a4), John E. Bauer (a1) and Elizabeth P. Ryan (a1) (a2)...

Summary

Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a nutrient-dense, low glycemic index food that supports healthy weight management in people and was examined for dogs. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and nutrient utilisation of navy (NB) and black (BB) bean-based diets in overweight or obese companion dogs undergoing a weight loss intervention. A nutritionally complete, dry extruded dog food was used as the control (CON) diet and two isocaloric, nutrient matched bean diets, containing either 25% w/w cooked BB or NB powder formed the test diets. Diets were fed to adult, overweight companion dogs for either four weeks (short-term study, n = 30) or for twenty-six weeks (long-term study, n = 15) at 60% of maintenance calories for ideal weight. Apparent weight loss increased over time in both the short- and long-term studies (p < 0.001) but was not different between the three study groups: apparent weight loss was between 4.05% – 6.14% for the short-term study and 14.0% – 17.9% in the long-term study. The ATTD was within expected ranges for all groups, whereby total dry matter and crude protein ATTD was 7–8% higher in the BB diet compared to CON (P < 0.05), crude fat ATTD was similar across all diets, and nitrogen free extract ATTD was 5–6% higher in both BB and NB compared to CON (P < 0.05). Metabolisable energy was similar for all diets, and ranged from 3,434–3,632 kcal/kg. At the end of each study period, dogs had haemoglobin levels ≥12 g/dl, packed cell volume ≥36%, albumin ≥2.4 g/dl, ALP ≤ 300 IU/l and all median values for each group were within defined limits for nutritional adequacy. This investigation demonstrated that BB and NB diets were safe, digestible, and supported weight loss in calorically restricted, overweight or obese, adult companion dogs.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding Author: Elizabeth P. Ryan; e.p.ryan@colostate.edu

References

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Keywords

Navy and black bean-based dog foods are digestible during weight loss in overweight and obese adult companion dogs

  • Genevieve M. Forster (a1), Nora Jean Nealon (a2), Dale Hill (a3), Tracey D. Jensen (a4), Teva L. Stone (a4), John E. Bauer (a1) and Elizabeth P. Ryan (a1) (a2)...

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