Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Effects of reducing anthelmintic input upon growth and faecal egg and larval counts in young farmed deer grazing chicory (Cichorium intybus) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)/white clover (Trifolium repens) pasture

  • S. O. HOSKIN (a1), T. N. BARRY (a1), P. R. WILSON (a2), W. A. G. CHARLESTON (a2) and J. HODGSON (a3)...

Abstract

A rotational grazing experiment using weaner deer was conducted at Palmerston North, New Zealand, during the autumn, winter and spring, to compare the voluntary feed intake (VFI), liveweight gain (LWG) and carcass production of deer grazing chicory with those grazing perennial ryegrass/white clover pasture. Deer were either treated with anthelmintic at 3-weekly intervals (T) or anthelmintic was withheld until trigger-treatment (TT) criteria were attained. Pure red and 0·75 red: 0·25 elk hybrid stags and hinds were given forage allowances of 5 kg DM/deer/day in autumn and early-mid winter, 6 kg DM/deer/day in late winter and 7 kg DM/deer/day in spring. Deer grazed chicory or pasture in autumn and spring, with all deer combined on pasture during winter when chicory was dormant. Organic matter digestibility of diet selected was greater for chicory than for pasture in both autumn and spring.

Anthelmintic-treated deer grazing pasture in autumn had significantly higher VFI and LWG, contributing to higher carcass weights, than TT deer. Anthelmintic treatment had no effect on these measures for deer grazing chicory in autumn. Clinical signs of lungworm infection were evident in pasture TT deer during autumn and winter, and in chicory TT deer grazing pasture during winter. Faecal egg counts (FEC) were significantly greater for pasture TT deer during autumn and early winter than all other groups. Faecal lungworm larval counts (FLC) were significantly greater for chicory TT deer following transfer to pasture, than for all other groups in early winter, although both FEC and FLC were low. Faecal larval counts were poorly related to clinical signs of lungworm infection during autumn, but were a better guide in winter. Plasma pepsinogen concentrations appeared unrelated to gastrointestinal parasite infection. Trigger-treated deer grazing pasture required five anthelmintic treatments during autumn and winter. The chicory TT group required no anthelmintic treatment when grazing chicory during autumn, but required two treatments after transfer from chicory to pasture during winter.

There was no effect of anthelmintic regime on VFI and LWG in spring, and LWG was greater for deer grazing chicory than those grazing pasture. Hybrid deer had greater spring LWG and carcass weights than red deer when grazing chicory, but similar LWG and carcass weights when grazing pasture.

It was concluded that grazing chicory offers the potential for reducing anthelmintic use in farmed weaner deer, particularly during autumn.

Copyright

Corresponding author

To whom all correspondence should be addressed. Email: T. N. Barry@massey.ac.nz
Type Description Title
PDF

 PDF (394 KB)
394 KB

Effects of reducing anthelmintic input upon growth and faecal egg and larval counts in young farmed deer grazing chicory (Cichorium intybus) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)/white clover (Trifolium repens) pasture

  • S. O. HOSKIN (a1), T. N. BARRY (a1), P. R. WILSON (a2), W. A. G. CHARLESTON (a2) and J. HODGSON (a3)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed