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Effect of cultivar and fungicide treatment on the yield and nutritive value of winter and spring oat grains grown in England and Wales, 1989–91

  • P. M. HAIGH (a1) and N. J. BRADSHAW (a2)

Abstract

The effect of a comprehensive (three-spray) fungicide programme on yield, specific weight (SW), 1000-grain weight (TGW), nutritive value and yield of both winter and spring oat grains was investigated over a 3-year period (1989–91). With winter oats, four cultivars (Aintree, Image or Pennal, Solva and Kynon), were tested at each of three sites (Gwent, Hereford and Kent). Similarly for spring oats, four cultivars (Dula, Keeper, Rollo and Rhiannon) were tested at each of three sites (Cornwall, North Yorkshire and Wales).

On winter oats, fungicide treatment produced a significant increase (P<0·05) in grain yield, but did not on spring oats. Fungicide treatment produced no significant effect on SW, TGW or nutritive value of the winter or spring oats. With winter oats, but not with spring oats, fungicide treatment produced a significant increase (P<0·05) in the yield of digestible (DE) and metabolizable (ME) energy for pigs and ruminants respectively.

The naked oats, Kynon and Rhiannon, had a significantly lower yield, higher SW and lower TGW than the other conventional cultivars (P<0·05). Their oil, fatty acid, protein, DE and ME contents were also significantly higher than the other cultivars (P<0·05). Nevertheless, the yield of protein, DE and ME tended to be less from naked oats than from some of the other cultivars tested.

On winter oats, TGW, protein content and protein yield, dry matter (DM) and fatty acid content and on spring oats, yield, TGW, ME yield, DM, oil, fatty acid, protein, DE and ME all varied between years. With winter oats, oil content and energy values were negatively correlated with yield and positively correlated with SW. With spring oats, DE and ME were positively correlated with SW.

It was concluded that, on winter oats, fungicide treatment was worthwhile in terms of grain yield, but this was not the case for spring oats. Also with winter oats, but not spring oats, fungicides gave useful increases in the yield of energy. The naked oats, Kynon and Rhiannon, had a distinct advantage in terms of nutritive value, but their low yield compared with the conventional cultivars tended to negate this benefit.

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Corresponding author

To whom all correspondence should be addressed. Email: mandy_cowie@adas.co.uk
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Effect of cultivar and fungicide treatment on the yield and nutritive value of winter and spring oat grains grown in England and Wales, 1989–91

  • P. M. HAIGH (a1) and N. J. BRADSHAW (a2)

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