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Multiple sire mating in swine; evidence of natural selection for mating efficiency

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

Lavon J. Sumption
Affiliation:
Animal Husbandry Department, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Extract

Evidence of natural selection for certain aspects of mating efficiency in swine are advanced based on preliminary studies with thirty-one sires, fiftyeight dams and their progeny. Selective fertilization was conclusively demonstrated. Variations in male and female mating behaviour were sufficiently large to indicate considerable non-randomness of mating frequency under the conditions of multiple sire mating (i.e. group exposure of dams to selected sires). The combined effects of the separate phenomena of selective fertilization and mating behaviour are discussed in relation to their evolutionary significance in animal breeding.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1961

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