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Finishing steers on high-grain rations. Effects of type of silage, level of urea, vitamin A and cobalt supplementation on body-weight gain, feed efficiency and carcass composition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

J. G. Morris
Affiliation:
Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane, Australia
R. J. W. Gartner
Affiliation:
Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane, Australia

Extract

1. A 23 factorial with a split-plot allocation of treatments was used to investigate the effects of silage type, (sweet v. grain sorghum); level of urea, (60ν. 120 g. per head per day); vitamin A,(0ν. 40,000 i.u. per head per day), and intraruminal cobalt oxide pellet on the performance of steers fed rations of 90% sorghum grain, 10% sorghum silage.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1967

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Finishing steers on high-grain rations. Effects of type of silage, level of urea, vitamin A and cobalt supplementation on body-weight gain, feed efficiency and carcass composition
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