Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-mkrr2 Total loading time: 26.478 Render date: 2021-04-13T10:50:39.926Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The effects of oxalate in tropical grasses on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium availability to cattle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

B. J. Blaney
Affiliation:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane 4105, Australia
R. J. W. Gartner
Affiliation:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane 4105, Australia
T. A. Head
Affiliation:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane 4105, Australia

Summary

Cattle were fed four hays in mineral balance experiments. Two of the hays (Cenchrus ciliaris and Setaria sphacelala var. sericea) contained 1·8 and 1·3% total oxalates and provided above- and below-maintenance intakes of calcium respectively. These grasses contain calcium oxalate crystals. The other two hays (Aristida spp –Bothriochloa spp. mixture and Triticum aestivum) contained 0·1% oxalates, and also provided above- and below-maintenance intakes of calcium. The absorptions of calcium from the hays providing above-maintenance intakes were 51% for the high and 57% for the low oxalate hay. At below-maintenance intakes, the cattle were in negative calcium balance and calcium absorptions were 52% for the high and 64% for the low oxalate hay. While in negative calcium balance the cattle were given single doses of calcium oxalate, followed by single doses of either limestone or rock phosphate. The cattle fed S. sphacelata hay absorbed sufficient calcium from calcium oxalate to achieve positive calcium balance, although the amount absorbed was only 52% of that absorbed from limestone. The cattle fed T. aestivum hay also absorbed calcium from calcium oxalate, but in insufficient amount to result in a positive calcium balance. The amount absorbed was 47% of that absorbed from rock phosphate. The results demonstrate that in tropical grasses containing calcium oxalate crystals, the availability of calcium is about 20% lower than it is in grasses containing little oxalate. Adaptation to oxalate may improve the ability of the rumen to utilize calcium oxalate. It is suggested that the availability of calcium to cattle grazing tropical grasses should be considered to be a maximum of 50%. Neither magnesium nor phosphorus absorptions from tropical grasses were affected by oxalate.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1982

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Agricultural Research Council (1980). The Nutrient Requirements of Ruminant Livestock. Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux.Google Scholar
Allison, M. J., Littledike, E. T. & James, L. F. (1977). Changes in ruminal oxalate degradation rates associated with adaptation to oxalate ingestion. Journal of Animal Science 45, 11731179.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Blaney, B. J., Gartner, R. J. W. & McKenzie, R. A. (1981 a). The effects of oxalate in some tropical grasses on the availability to horses of calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 97, 507514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blaney, B. J., Gartner, R. J. W. & McKenzie, R. A. (1981 b). The inability of horses to absorb calcium from calcium oxalate. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 97, 639641.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ferguson, I. B., Turner, N. A. & Bollard, E. G. (1980). Problems in fractionating calcium in plant tissue. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 31, 714.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Groenendyk, S. & Seawright, A. A. (1974). Osteodystrophia fibrosa in horses grazing Setaria sphacelata. Australian Veterinary Journal 50, 131132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodgkinson, A. (1977). Oxalic Acid in Biology and Medicine. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
McKenzie, R. A., Blanby, B. J. & Gartner, R. J. W. (1981). The effect of dietary oxalate on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium balances in horses. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 97, 6974.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Minson, D. J. & Norton, B. W. (1982). The possibleb cause of the absence of hypomagnesaemia in cattle grazing tropical pastures – a review. Proceedings of the Australian Society of Animal Production 14, 357360.Google Scholar
Negi, S. S. (1971). Calcium assimilation in relation to metabolism of soluble and insoluble oxalates in the ruminant system: a reappraisal. Indian Journal of Animal Science 41, 913921.Google Scholar
Schryver, H. F., Craig, P. H., Hintz, H. F., Hogue, D. E. & Lowe, J. E. (1970). The site of calcium absorption in the horse. Journal of Nutrition 100,11271131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walthall, J. C. & McKenzie, R. A. (1976). Osteodystrophia fibrosa in horses at pasture in Queensland: field and laboratory observations. Australian Veterinary Journal 52, 1116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ward, G., Harbers, L. H. & Blaha, J. L. (1979). Calcium-containing crystals in alfalfa: their fate in cattle. Journal of Dairy Science 62, 715722.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 22 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 13th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The effects of oxalate in tropical grasses on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium availability to cattle
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The effects of oxalate in tropical grasses on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium availability to cattle
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The effects of oxalate in tropical grasses on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium availability to cattle
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *