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The effect of dietary oxalate on calcium, phosphorus and magnesium balances in horses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

R. A. McKenzie
Affiliation:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane 4105, Australia
B. J. Blaney
Affiliation:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane 4105, Australia
R. J. W. Gartner
Affiliation:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Animal Research Institute, Yeerongpilly, Brisbane 4105, Australia

Summary

Negative calcium and phosphorus balances were produced in two experiments on six horses fed diets containing 2·6 or 4·3% total oxalate. The main calcium and phosphorus loss was in faeces. The urinary loss of calcium was reduced and that of phosphorus increased. A positive balance of magnesium was maintained. No clinically significant changes in blood concentrations of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium or alkaline phosphatase were produced. The bulk of ingested oxalate was unaccounted for in faeces and urine. It is suggested that the intestinal bacterial flora utilized the oxalate. The results supported the hypothesis that dietary oxalate is the cause of equine nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism which arises when horses graze several tropical grass species.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1981

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