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Industrialization in Agriculture: Discussion

  • Kimberly L. Jensen (a1)

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Drabenstott and Davis and Langham both present insightful discussions of the causes and consequences of industrialization in agriculture. Their discussions address industrialization as defined by the Council of Food, Agriculture, and Resource Economics (CFARE). According to CFARE, industrialization includes two components, increased consolidation of farms and increased vertical coordination within the marketing channels for food and fiber. Davis and Langham focus primarily on the causes and consequences of increasing consolidation of farms, while Drabenstott focuses on the causes and consequences of vertical coordination. This definition of industrialization should be expanded to include consolidation of firms that provide inputs and services to agriculture and consolidation of firms that handle and process agricultural products.

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Barkema A. M., Drabenstott, and Cook, M.. “The Industrialization of the U.S. Food System,” Food and Agricultural Marketing Issues for the 21st Century. Ed. by Padberg, D., Food and Agricultural Marketing Consortium 93-1, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 1993, pp. 320.
Bureau of the Census, Economics and Statistics Administration. 1992 Census of Agriculture. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C.
Caswell, J. and Perloff, J.. “Implications of the New Industrial Organization and Demand Models for Marketing Research,” Food and Agricultural Marketing Issues for the 21st Century. Ed. by Padberg, D., Food and Agricultural Marketing Consortium 93-1, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 1993, pp. 6876.
Coffey, J.Implications for Farm Supply Cooperatives of the Industrialization of Agriculture,Amer. J. Agr. Econ. 75(1993): 11321136.
Council on Food, Agriculture, and Resource Economics. Industrialization of U.S. Agriculture: Policy. Research, and Education Needs. Washington, D.C, April,1994, p.1.
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Padberg, D.Foreword.” Food and Agricultural Marketing Issues for the 21st Century. Ed. by Padberg, D., Food and Agricultural Marketing Consortium 93-1, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 1993.
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van Ravenswaay, E.Linkages Between Agricultural Marketing and Environmental Policies,” Food and Agricultural Marketing Issues for the 21st Centwy. Ed. by Padberg, D., Food and Agricultural Marketing Consortium 93-1, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 1993, pp. 4353.

Industrialization in Agriculture: Discussion

  • Kimberly L. Jensen (a1)

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