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Economic Impacts of Business Continuity on an Outbreak of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Minnesota Egg Laying Operations

  • Jada M. Thompson (a1), Dustin L. Pendell (a2), Tim Boyer (a3), Kelly A. Patyk (a3), Sasidhar Malladi (a4) and J. Todd Weaver (a3)...

Abstract

Animal disease outbreaks can cause disruptions in domestic and international markets. Business continuity aims to provide a proactive approach to alleviate some of these negative effects on consumers, producers, and agribusinesses. Using a partial equilibrium model of the U.S. egg industry, the economic impacts of business continuity during an epidemiological simulated disease event are modeled. Results show total welfare losses can be reduced by allowing permitted movement during an outbreak given a specified level of biosecurity. Understanding the potential market responses business continuity can have on the market may lead to reductions in the negative implications of a disease event.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author. Email: jthom207@utk.edu

References

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Supplementary materials

Thompson et al. supplementary material
Appendix B

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Supplementary materials

Thompson et al. supplementary material
Appendix A

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