Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Supply and Demand for Married Female Labor: Rural and Urban Differences In the Southern United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2015


Jeffrey Alwang
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Judith I. Stallmann
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Get access

Abstract

This study examined the supply of and demand for married female labor in the southern United States. Special attention was given to differences in labor force participation, labor supply, and quantities of labor supplied and demanded across rural and urban areas. Once state effects were accounted for, decisions to change participation were found not to vary by urban-rural designation. Differences in demand were fully captured by an intercept shifter and the variations in hours supplied by married females between urban and rural areas. Labor supply varied greatly with the effects of key determinants (number of children, work force experience, family income) being strongly different in rural areas. Different policies are needed to promote female labor supply in rural areas as opposed to urban areas.


Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 1992

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Basmann, R. L.On Finite Sample Distributions of Generalized Classical Linear Identifiable Test Statistic.” J. Am. Stat. Assoc., 55(1960): 650659.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blank, Rebecca M.Are Part-time Jobs Bad Jobs?,” In A Future of Lousy Jobs? Burtless, Gary, ed. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 1990, pp. 123164.Google Scholar
Blank, Rebecca M.Simultaneously Modeling the Supply of Weeks and Hours of Work Among Female Household Heads.” J. Labor Econ., 6.2 (1988): 177204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blau, David M., and Robins, Philip K.. “Child-care Costs and Family Labor Supply.” Rev. Econ. and Stat, (1988): 374381.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blundell, Richard, Ham, John, and Meghir, Costas. “Unemployment and Female Labor Supply.” The Economic Journal, 97(1987): 4464.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heckman, James, “Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply.” Econometrica, 42(1974): 679894.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heckman, James. “The Common Structure of Statistical Models of Truncation, Sample Selection, and Limited Dependent Variables and a Simple Estimator for Such Models.” Annals of Econ. and Soc. Meas., 5(1976): 475492.Google Scholar
Heckman, James. “Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error.” Econometrica, 47(1979): 153161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huffman, Wallace E., and Lange, Mark D.. “Off-farm Work Decisions of Husbands and Wives: Joint Decision Making.” Rev. Econ. and Stat,. (1989): 471480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lundberg, Shelly. “Labor Supply of Husbands and Wives: A Simultaneous Equations Approach.” Rev. Econ. and Stat., (1988): 224235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maddala, G. S.Limited-dependent and Qualitative Variables in Econometrics. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mroz, Thomas A.The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions.” Econometrica. (1987): 765799.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nakamura, Alice, and Nakamura, Masao. “A Comparison of the Labor Force Behavior of Married Women in the United States and Canada with Special Attention to the Impact of Income Taxes.” Econometrica, 49.2 (1981): 451489.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nakamura, Alice, and Nakamura, Masao. “Dynamic Models of the Labor Force Behavior of Married Women which can be Estimated Using Limited Amounts of Past Information.” J. Econometrics. 27(1985): 273298.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nakamura, Masao, Nakamura, Alice, and Collen, Dallas. “Job Opportunities, the Offered Wage, and the Labor Supply of Married Women.” Am. Econ. Rev., (1979): 787805.Google Scholar
Spanos, Aris. Statistical Foundations of Econometric Modelling. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stern, Nicholas. “On the Specification of Labor Supply Functions.” Unemployment, Search and Labor Supply, In Blundell, Richard and Walker, Ian, eds., New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986. pp. 143190.Google Scholar
Summers, Gene F., Horton, Francine, and Gringeri, Christian. “Rural Labor Market Changes in the U.S.” In National Rural Studies Committee: A Proceedings, Castle, Emery N., ed. Cedar Falls, Iowa, May 1990, pp. 6179.Google Scholar
Tokle, J. G., and Huffman, Wallace E.. “Local Economic Conditions and Wage Labor Decisions of Farm and Rural Nonfarm Couples,” Am. J. Agr. Econ., 73.3(1991): 652670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 10 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-z76xg Total loading time: 0.252 Render date: 2020-12-04T03:11:43.400Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Fri Dec 04 2020 02:59:36 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Supply and Demand for Married Female Labor: Rural and Urban Differences In the Southern United States
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Supply and Demand for Married Female Labor: Rural and Urban Differences In the Southern United States
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Supply and Demand for Married Female Labor: Rural and Urban Differences In the Southern United States
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *