Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF INDEPENDENCE AND SOCIALISM IN NORTH PARE, TANZANIA, 1961–88

  • MICHAEL J. SHERIDAN (a1)

Abstract

This article draws on archival sources and oral histories to describe changing post-colonial land management in the North Pare Mountains of Tanzania. The independent state transformed colonial institutions but did not maintain colonial common property regimes for water source, irrigation and forest management. Farmers responded by encroaching upon and dividing the commons. After 1967, Tanzania's socialist policies affected environmental conditions in North Pare indirectly by increasing the ambiguity and negotiability of resource entitlements. The material, social and cultural legacies of these processes include environmental change, declining management capacity and persistent doubt about the value of ‘conservation’.

Copyright

Footnotes

Hide All
Ethnographic and archival research for this article was conducted in Usangi Division, Mwanga, Dar es Salaam, Moshi and Arusha in 1997–8. It was supported by grants from the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research and the Fulbright program. Informants were selected based on their status as the managers and caretakers of common property resources, such as water sources, irrigation systems and sacred forests. Interview transcripts are available upon request from the author, Sociology/Anthropology Dept., University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 USA. The author thanks the anonymous reviewers of the JAH for their perceptive comments.

Footnotes

Keywords

THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF INDEPENDENCE AND SOCIALISM IN NORTH PARE, TANZANIA, 1961–88

  • MICHAEL J. SHERIDAN (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed