Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-vmws4 Total loading time: 11.725 Render date: 2021-04-11T03:31:14.135Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Psychoeducation: priorities of service users and service providers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

Mohamed Ahmed
Affiliation:
Brothers of Charity Services, Galway and Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
Michael Reilly
Affiliation:
Sligo General Hospital, Sligo, Ireland
Carol Cassidy
Affiliation:
Lucena Clinic, Rathgar, Dublin 6, Ireland
Laura Mannion
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Galway, Ireland
Corresponding

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study was to ascertain the topics patients and mental health professionals thought should be covered in a psychoeducation programme at a day hospital.

Methods: Patients at the psychiatric day hospital and mental health professionals were invited to complete the study questionnaire. Replies from 101 participants were analysed.

Results: The patients and mental health professionals generally agreed regarding the topics to be covered in the eight-week psychoeducation programme. Patients tended to score ‘suicide’ as more important than did the mental health professionals.

Conclusions: Patients in a day hospital setting and mental health professionals share similar concerns about what information needs to be imparted about the patients' illnesses. However, suicide is seen by patients as a more important topic in such a setting.

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1.National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence The Management of Bipolar Affective Disorder in Adults, Children and Adolescents on Primary and Secondary Care. NICE, 2006.Google Scholar
2.American Psychiatric Association. Guidelines for Treatment of Schizophrenia. APA, 2004.Google Scholar
3.Altamura, AC, Bobes, J, Cunninghamowens, D, et al. Principle of practice from the European Expert Panel on Contemporary Treatment of Schizophrenia. Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract 2000; 4(suppl. 1): 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Pekkala, E, Merinder, L.Psychoeducation for schizophrenia. Cochrane Database Systematic Review, 2, CD002831. 2002.Google Scholar
5.Feldmann, R, Hornung, WP, Prein, B, et al. Timing of psychoeducational psychotherapeutic interventions in schizophrenic patients. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2002; 252: 115119.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6.Thobaben, M. (1997). Suicide myths and health care provider bias. Home Care Provider 1997; 2(3): 109111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7.Rutz, W, von Knorring, L, Walinder, J.Long-term effects of an educational program for general practitioners given by the Swedish Committee for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression. Acta Psych Scand 1992; 85: 8388.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Rihmer, Z.Strategies of suicide prevention: Focus on health care. J Affect Dis 1996; 39(2): 8391.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 34 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 11th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Psychoeducation: priorities of service users and service providers
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Psychoeducation: priorities of service users and service providers
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Psychoeducation: priorities of service users and service providers
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *