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Oedipism: Auto-enucleation in a schizophrenic patient

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

Mary Murphy
Affiliation:
Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology, Hurstwood Park Neurological Centre, Lewes Road, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, RH16 4EX
Malavika Nathan
Affiliation:
Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology, Hurstwood Park Neurological Centre, Lewes Road, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, RH16 4EX
Edward Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, Sussex Eye Hospital, Eastern Road, Brighton, BN2 5BF, England
Brian Parsons
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Meter Misericordiae Hospital, Eccles St, Dublin 7, Ireland
Lal Gunasekera
Affiliation:
Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology, Hurstwood Park Neurological Centre, Lewes Road, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, RH16 4EX

Abstract

We report the rare occurrence of subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to probable auto-enucleation of the orbit (oedipism) and we document management of these co-incident pathologies in a schizophrenic patient.

A 67 year old schizophrenic woman suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage and presented with seizures following enucleation of her right eye. Initial efforts should focus on investigation and management of the subarachnoid haemorrhage. Management of Oedipism must include collaboration between psychiatrists, neurosurgeons and opthalmologists, focusing on management of the subarachnoid haemorrhage with precautions to prevent further self-injurious behaviour.

Type
Case report
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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