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Why there is International Theory now

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2009

Duncan Snidal
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science and Harris Graduate School of Public Policy, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Alexander Wendt
Affiliation:
Mershon Center and Political Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

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Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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References

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