Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-s65px Total loading time: 3.957 Render date: 2021-02-26T16:46:06.926Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Promoting norms to limit violence in crisis situations: challenges, strategies and alliances

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2010

Extract

In Somalia, a group of young actors, musicians and scriptwriters are working on a play which is to be produced, filmed and distributed in the form of a video throughout the country. One scene shows a young militiaman boasting of how he has terrorized the population and the reaction of the woman he loves. She evokes the suffering caused by his conduct and refuses to marry a man who has disregarded the code of honour of his clan. This creative work contains a message for young militiamen about the effect of unbridled violence on both its victims and its perpetrators.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Committee of the Red Cross 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 In this article, the terms “dissemination” and “promotion of international humanitarian law” are used synonymously. The word “dissemination” appears in the Geneva Conventions; it denotes action taken to spread knowledge of the content of the humanitarian treaties. However, the term “promotion” is more appropriate to encompass the whole range of the ICRC's activities aimed at improving understanding and acceptance of humanitarian law.

2 The International Review of the Red Cross recently devoted the major part of an issue to the dissemination of international humanitarian law (No. 319, July–August 1997, pp. 357–454).

3 Articles 47/48/127/144 respectively of the four Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949; Article 83 of Additional Protocol I and Article 19 of Additional Protocol II of 8 June 1977.

4 Bayart, Jean-François, L'illusion identitaire, Editions Fayard, 1996, 306 pp.Google Scholar

5 Woza Africa! Music goes to war, Jonathan Ball Publishers, Johannesburg, 1997, 96 pp.Google Scholar

6 Anderson, Mary B., Do no harm: Supporting local capacities for peace through aid, Cambridge, Local Capacities for Peace Project, 1996, 61 pp.Google Scholar

7 In the literature available to us the concept of conflict prevention does not generally cover crisis management once violence has erupted, nor conflict management, conflict mitigation or peace-making. On the topic of conflict prevention, see Preventing a violent conflict: A study, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Stockholm, 1997, 67 pp.Google Scholar (in particular pp. 35 and 36).

8 Bertrand, Maurice, “Vers une stratégie de prévention des conflits?”, Politique étrangère, Spring 1997, pp. 112123.Google Scholar

9 On this subject, see Chopard, Jean-Luc, “Dissemination of the humanitarian rules and cooperation with National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies for the purpose of prevention”, International Review of the Red Cross, No. 306, May–June 1995, pp. 244262.Google Scholar

10 DAC principles for effective aid, Development Assistance Manual, OECD, Paris, 1992.Google Scholar

11 An independent commission comprising 28 international leaders has drawn up a report on this topic, which we recommend to the reader: Our global neighbourhood, Report of the Commission on Global Governance, Oxford University Press, 1995, 410 pp.Google Scholar

12 Russbach, Olivier, “Une justice internationale à carle”, Politique Internationale, No. 67, Spring 1995, 13 pp.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 9 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 26th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Promoting norms to limit violence in crisis situations: challenges, strategies and alliances
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Promoting norms to limit violence in crisis situations: challenges, strategies and alliances
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Promoting norms to limit violence in crisis situations: challenges, strategies and alliances
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *