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The times they are a-changin’: cohort effects in aging, cognition, and dementia 1

  • Mary Ganguli (a1)

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Two papers recently published in IPG point toward decreasing rates of cognitive decline and dementia in high-income countries. (Dodge et al., 2016; Kosteniuk et al., 2016). These reports join the ranks of a growing body of literature on generational trends, or more, specifically, “cohort effects,” in aging, cognitive decline, and dementia.

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1

The title of this editorial refers to a song of the same name by Bob Dylan, recipient of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature.

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References

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Dodge, H. H., Zhu, J., Lee, C. W., Chang, C.-C. H. and Ganguli, M. (2014). Cohort effects in age-associated cognitive trajectories. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 69, 687694.
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The times they are a-changin’: cohort effects in aging, cognition, and dementia 1

  • Mary Ganguli (a1)

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