Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Social aspects of dementia and dementia practice

  • Irja Haapala (a1) (a2), Simon Biggs (a1) (a3) (a4) and Susan Kurrle (a5)

Extract

Social aspects of dementia are becoming increasingly important as part of a wider shift in emphasis from cure to care. This is partly because approaches based on finding a cure have proved far more difficult and complex than originally imagined (WHO, 2016). New evidence on the effectiveness of public health measures, that while incidence is growing as the proportion of older people in society increases its prevalence amongst older adults is actually falling, has also lead to increased interest in social dimensions of prevention, lifestyle change, and practical intervention in community settings (Prince et al., 2016; Kivipelto et al., 2017). This, in turn, has led to a rediscovery of the role of supports to people living with dementia in their daily lives, the needs of informal carers, and professional activities that can maintain the social engagement of each party (Winblad et al., 2016). The expansion of practice around person-centered care, beyond traditional institutional settings, has also contributed to a socialized view of how interactions in dementia care are thought about (Bartlett et al., 2017), as has an increased awareness of the effects of the social construction of dementia in the public mind (Biggs, 2018). Most recently, people living with dementia, and particularly with respect to younger onset dementia, have begun to find a voice and to make connections to the wider disability movement (Dementia Alliance International, 2017). Each of these developments, in their different ways, have led to a re-emphasis on psycho-social elements of dementia, its experience, and how that might translate into clinical practice and service delivery.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Social aspects of dementia and dementia practice
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Social aspects of dementia and dementia practice
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Social aspects of dementia and dementia practice
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Bartlett, R., Windemuth-Wolfson, L., Oliver, K. and Dening, T. (2017). Suffering with dementia: the other side of “living well’’. International Psychogeriatrics, 29, 177179. doi:10.1017/S104161021600199X
Biggs, S. (2018). Negotiating Ageing: Cultural Adaptation to the Prospect of a Long Life. London: Routledge.
Blair, A., Anderson, K. and Bateman, C. (2018). The “Golden Angels”: effects of trained volunteers on specialling and readmission rates for people with dementia and delirium in rural hospitals. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 17071716.
Cole, L., Samsi, K. and Manthorpe, J. (2018). Is there an “optimal time” to move to a care home for a person with dementia? a systematic review of the literature. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16491670.
Conway, E. R., Watson, B., Tatangelo, G. and McCabe, M. (2018). Is it all bleak? a systematic review of factors contributing to relationship change in dementia. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16191637.
Dementia Alliance International (2017). Available at: http://www.dementiaallianceinternational.org/; last accessed 23 August 2018.
Gresham, M., Heffernan, M. and Brodaty, H. (2018). The Going to Stay at Home program: combining dementia caregiver training and residential respite care. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16971706.
Haapala, I., Carr, A. and Biggs, S. (2018). Differences in priority by age group and perspective: implications for public health education and campaigning in relation to dementia. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 15831591.
Kishita, N., Hammond, L., Dietrich, C. M. and Mioshi, E. (2018). Which interventions work for dementia family carers?: an updated systematic review of randomized controlled trials of carer interventions. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16791696.
Kivipelto, M., Mangialasche, F. and Ngandu, T. (2017). Can lifestyle changes prevent cognitive impairment? The Lancet Neurology, 16, 338339.
Nguyen, K. and Comans, T. (2018). Where are we at with model-based economic evaluations of interventions for dementia? a systematic review and quality assessment. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 15931605.
Prince, M., Comas-Herrera, A., Knapp, M., Guerchet, M. and Karagiannidou, M. (2016). World Alzheimer Report 2016. Improving Healthcare for People Living with Dementia: Coverage, Quality and Costs Now and in the Future. London: Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI).
Sinclair, C. et al. (2018). How couples with dementia experience healthcare, lifestyle, and everyday decision-making. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16391647.
Smith, K. J., George, C. and Ferriera, N. (2018). Factors emerging from the “Zarit Burden Interview” and predictive variables in a UK sample of caregivers for people with dementia. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16711678.
Szcześniak, D. et al. (2018). Does the community-based combined Meeting Center Support Programme (MCSP) make the pathway to day-care activities easier for people living with dementia? a comparison before and after implementation of MCSP in three European countries. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 17171734.
Vernooij-Dassen, M., Moniz-Cook, E. and Jeon, Y.-H. (2018). Social health in dementia care: harnessing an applied research agenda. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 775778.
WHO. (2016). WHO Global Action Plan on the Public Health Response to Dementia 2017–2025. Geneva: World Health Organisation.
Winblad, B. et al. (2016). ‘Defeating Alzheimer's disease and other dementias: a priority for European science and society’. The Lancet Neurology, 15, 455532.
Ydstebø, A., Bergh, S., Selbæk, G., Benth, J. Š., Brønnick, K. and Vossius, C. (2018). Longitudinal changes in quality of life among elderly people with and without dementia. International Psychogeriatrics, 30, 16071618.

Social aspects of dementia and dementia practice

  • Irja Haapala (a1) (a2), Simon Biggs (a1) (a3) (a4) and Susan Kurrle (a5)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed