Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-54cdcc668b-tx8dt Total loading time: 0.354 Render date: 2021-03-09T08:59:05.332Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

What do subjective cognitive complaints in persons with aging-associated cognitive decline reflect?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2005

Matthias Kliegel
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychology, Department of Gerontopsychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Daniel Zimprich
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychology, Department of Gerontopsychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Anne Eschen
Affiliation:
Gerontopsychiatric Center, Psychiatric University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

Background: Subjective cognitive complaints have been included in diagnostic concepts such as Aging-Associated Cognitive Decline (AACD) aiming to identify older adults with cognitive impairments at high risk of developing dementia. Although several studies in normal aging have found that subjective cognitive complaints are related to depressive affect and personality factors, little is known as to whether this is also true for older adults with AACD.

Methods: In 123 older adults diagnosed with AACD and 291 controls, the role of actual cognitive performance, depressive affect, neuroticism and conscientiousness in predicting subjective cognitive complaints was investigated. In separate ordinary least squares regression analyses for both groups with gender, age, years of schooling, cognitive performance, depressive affect, neuroticism and conscientiousness as predicting variables, in the control participants, gender, age, depressive affect and neuroticism were related to subjective cognitive complaints, whereas in the AACD participants only gender and neuroticism accounted for variance in subjective cognitive complaints. Testing for group differences in predictive power, revealed differential effects for gender, depressive affect and neuroticism.

Conclusions: As subjective cognitive complaints in the AACD group were related to neuroticism and gender rather than to cognitive performance, their inclusion in diagnostic concepts such as AACD should be revaluated. However, the nature of subjective cognitive complaints might be qualitatively different in persons diagnosed with AACD compared to those stated by normal older adults.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
International Psychogeriatric Association 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 127 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 9th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

What do subjective cognitive complaints in persons with aging-associated cognitive decline reflect?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

What do subjective cognitive complaints in persons with aging-associated cognitive decline reflect?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

What do subjective cognitive complaints in persons with aging-associated cognitive decline reflect?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *