Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h4v4t Total loading time: 0.4 Render date: 2022-06-27T00:59:54.619Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Report of an International Psychogeriatric Association Special Meeting Work Group; Under the Cosponsorship of Alzheimer's Disease International, the European Federation of Neurological Societies, the World Health Organization, and the World Psychiatric Association

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2005

Barry Reisberg
Affiliation:
Aging and Dementia Research Center, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Alistair Burns
Affiliation:
Withington Hospital, University of Manchester, Department of Psychiatry, West Didsbury, Manchester, UK
Henry Brodaty
Affiliation:
Academic Department of Psychogeriatrics, Prince Henry Hospital, Little Bay, New South Wales, Australia
Robin Eastwood
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Martin Rossor
Affiliation:
Dementia Research Group, The National Hospital at Queen Square, London, UK
Norman Sartorius
Affiliation:
Départment de Psychiatrie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
Bengt Winblad
Affiliation:
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden

Abstract

Current knowledge with respect to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is reviewed. There is agreement that AD is a characteristic clinicopathologic entity that is amenable to diagnosis. The diagnosis of AD should no longer be considered one of exclusion. Rather, the diagnostic process is one of recognition of the characteristic features of AD and of conditions that can have an impact on presentation or mimic aspects of the clinicopathologic picture. The present availability of improved prognosis, management, and treatment strategies makes the proper, and state-of-the-art, diagnosis of AD a clinical imperative in all medical settings. Concurrently, information regarding the relevance and applicability of current diagnostic procedures in diverse cultural settings must continue to accrue.

Type
Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease
Copyright
© 1997 International Psychogeriatric Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

Special Meeting Work Group Participants and Affiliations
18
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Report of an International Psychogeriatric Association Special Meeting Work Group; Under the Cosponsorship of Alzheimer's Disease International, the European Federation of Neurological Societies, the World Health Organization, and the World Psychiatric Association
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Report of an International Psychogeriatric Association Special Meeting Work Group; Under the Cosponsorship of Alzheimer's Disease International, the European Federation of Neurological Societies, the World Health Organization, and the World Psychiatric Association
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Report of an International Psychogeriatric Association Special Meeting Work Group; Under the Cosponsorship of Alzheimer's Disease International, the European Federation of Neurological Societies, the World Health Organization, and the World Psychiatric Association
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *