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Prevalence of dementia and factors associated with dementia in rural Bangladesh: data from a cross-sectional, population-based study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 July 2014

Katie Palmer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
Zarina N. Kabir
Affiliation:
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Tanvir Ahmed
Affiliation:
International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Jena D. Hamadani
Affiliation:
International Center for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Christel Cornelius
Affiliation:
Aging Research Centre, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Miia Kivipelto
Affiliation:
Aging Research Centre, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Åke Wahlin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden Aging Research Centre, NVS, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

There are currently no published reports of dementia prevalence or factors associated with dementia occurrence in Bangladesh. The aims are to report the prevalence of definite and questionable dementia in rural Bangladesh, and examine factors potentially associated with dementia occurrence, including sociodemographic, clinical, social, and nutritional factors.

Methods:

We used data from a population-based, cross-sectional study from Matlab, in rural Bangladesh, on 471 persons aged 60+ years. Participants underwent a clinical examination including diagnosis of somatic disorders, and a structured interview including questions about sociodemographic and social factors. Nutritional status was measured with the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and blood tests were conducted to assess a range of nutritional and clinical aspects. Age- and sex-specific dementia prevalence was calculated. Crude and adjusted logistic regression was used to examine associations between dementia and clinical, social, and nutritional factors. Dementia was diagnosed using a two-step procedure by physicians according to DSM-IV criteria.

Results:

The prevalence of questionable dementia was 11.5% and definite dementia was 3.6%. Dementia prevalence increased with increasing years of age (adjusted OR: 1.04; 95% CI = 1.002–1.1) and decreased with more years of education (adjusted OR: 0.8; 95% CI = 0.6–0.99). Being malnourished increased the odds of dementia almost six-fold (adjusted OR: 5.9; 95% CI = 1.3–26.3), while frequent participation in social activities was associated with a decreased odds (adjusted OR: 0.5; 95% CI = 0.2–0.9).

Conclusions:

The prevalence of dementia in rural Bangladesh is similar to other countries in the South Asia region, but lower than reports from other world regions. Malnutrition is strongly associated with dementia occurrence, and is a relevant area for future research within low-income countries.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2014 

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