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Musings on methods and modalities in the study and care of older adults with serious mental illness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 December 2020

Carl I. Cohen
Affiliation:
Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, NY, USA
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Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2020

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References

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