Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-dxfhg Total loading time: 0.411 Render date: 2021-02-26T22:16:11.248Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Impact of the nursing home scale on residents’ social engagement in South Korea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 September 2016

Ju Young Yoon
Affiliation:
College of Nursing and Research Institute of Nursing Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110–799, South Korea
Hongsoo Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Aging, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151–742, South Korea
Young-Il Jung
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151–742, South Korea
Jung-Hwa Ha
Affiliation:
Department of Social Welfare, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151–742, South Korea
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

This study aimed to describe the levels of social engagement and to examine the relationship between the nursing home scale groups and social engagement in nursing homes in South Korea.

Methods:

A total of 314 residents were randomly selected from rosters provided by 10 nursing homes located in three metropolitan areas in South Korea. The outcome variable was social engagement measured by the Revised Index of Social Engagement (RISE), and the key independent variable was the nursing home scale (small, medium, and large). Individual factors (age, gender, activities of daily living and cognitive function, and depressive symptoms) and organizational factors (location, ownership, and staffing levels) were controlled in the model as covariates. Multilevel logistic regression was used in this study.

Results:

About half of the residents (46%) in this study were not socially engaged in the nursing home (RISE=0) where they resided. Controlling for individual- and organizational-level factors, the nursing home facility size was a significant factor to predict the likelihood of residents’ social engagement, with that the residents in large-scale nursing homes being less likely to be socially engaged than those in medium-scale nursing homes (odds ratio = 0.457; p-value = 0.005).

Conclusion:

This study supports evidence from previous studies that smaller-scale nursing homes are likely to provide more person-centered care compared to larger-scale nursing homes. Subsequent quality studies are needed to examine how the mechanisms for how smaller-scale nursing homes can enhance residents’ social engagement in terms of care delivery processes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Backhaus, R., Verbeek, H., van Rossum, E., Capezuti, E. and Hamers, J. P. H. (2014). Nurse staffing impact on quality of care in nursing homes: a systematic review of longitudinal studies. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 15, 383393.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bang, E. J. and Yun, S. Y. (2010). Health needs of the elderly in long-term care facilities: Using RAI-MDS-FC. Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing, 21, 263272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burrows, A. B., Morris, J. N., Simon, S. E., Hirdes, J. P. and Phillips, C. (2000). Development of a minimum data set-based depression rating scale for use in nursing homes. Age and Ageing, 29, 165172.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cassie, K. M. and Cassie, W. E. (2012). Organizational and individual conditions associated with depressive symptoms among nursing home residents over time. The Gerontologist, 52, 812821.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cohen-Mansfield, J., Marx, M. S., Thein, K. and Dakheel-Ali, M. (2010). The impact of past and present preferences on stimulus engagement in nursing home residents with dementia. Aging & Mental Health, 14, 6773.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
De Rooij, A. H. P. M., Luijkx, K. G., Schaafsma, J., Declercq, A. G., Emmerink, P. M. J. and Schols, J. M. G. A. (2012). Quality of life of residents with dementia in traditional versus small-scale long-term care settings: A quasi-experimental study. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 49, 931940.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gerritsen, D. L., Steverink, N., Frijters, D. H. M., Hirdes, J. P., Ooms, M. E. and Ribbe, M. W. (2008). A revised index for social engagement for long-term care. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 34, 4048.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hirdes, J. P. et al. (2008). Reliability of the interRAI suite of assessment instruments: a 12-country study of an integrated health information system. BMC Health Services Research, 8, 277.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kane, R. A., Lum, T. Y., Cutler, L. J., Degenholtz, H. B. and Yu, T.-C. (2007). Resident outcomes in small-house nursing homes: a longitudinal evaluation of the initial green house program. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 55, 832839.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kiely, D. K. and Flacker, J. M. (2003). The protective effect of social engagement on 1-year mortality in a long-stay nursing home population. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 56, 472478.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, H., Jung, Y. I., Sung, M., Lee, J. Y., Yoon, J. Y. and Yoon, J. L. (2015). Reliability of the interRAI long-term care facilities (interRAI LTCF) and interRAI home care (interRAI-HC). Geriatrics and Gerontology International, 15, 220228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, H., Kovner, C., Harrington, C., Greene, W. and Mezey, M. (2009). A panel data analysis of the relationships of nursing home staffing levels and standards to regulatory deficiencies. Journals of Gerontology, 64B, 269278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kolanowski, A., Buettner, L., Litaker, M. and Yu, F. (2006). Factors that relate to activity engagement in nursing home residents. American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias, 21, 1522.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Koren, M. J. (2010). Person-centered care for nursing home residents: the culture-change movement. Health Affairs, 29, 312317.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, T. W., Cho, S. Y. and Jang, Y. K. (2009). Predictors of nursing service need for nursing homes residents. Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing, 39, 95106.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lou, V. W. Q., Chi, I., Kwan, C. W. and Leung, A. Y. M. (2013). Trajectories of social engagement and depressive symptoms among long-term care facility residents in Hong Kong. Age and Ageing, 42, 215222.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lucas, J. A. et al. (2007). The relationship between organizational factors and resident satisfaction with nursing home care and life. Journal of Aging & Social Policy, 19, 125151.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mor, V., Finne-Soveri, H., Hirdes, J. and Gilgen, R. (2009). Long term care quality monitoring using the interRAI common clinical assessment language. In Performance Measurement for Health System Improvement: Experience, Challenges, and Prospects, 1st edn. (pp. 472506). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Morris, J. N. et al. (1994). MDS cognitive performance scale. Journal of Gerontology, 49, M174–182.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morris, J. N., Fries, B. E. and Morris, S. A. (1999). Scaling ADLs within the MDS. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 54, M546–553.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Park, H. (2015). Legislating for filial piety: an indirect approach to promoting family support and responsibility for older people in Korea. Journal of Aging & Social Policy, 27, 280293.Google ScholarPubMed
Rabig, J. (2009). Home again: small houses for individuals with cognitive impairment. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 35, 1015.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schreiner, A. S., Yamamoto, E. and Shiotani, H. (2005). Positive affect among nursing home residents with Alzheimer's dementia: the effect of recreational activity. Aging & Mental Health, 9, 129134.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shippee, T. P., Henning-Smith, C., Kane, R. L. and Lewis, T. (2015). Resident- and facility-level predictors of quality of life in long-term care. The Gerontologist, 55, 643655.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spilsbury, K., Hewitt, C., Stirk, L. and Bowman, C. (2011). The relationship between nurse staffing and quality of care in nursing homes: a systematic review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48, 732750.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Te Boekhorst, S., Depla, M. F. I. A., de Lange, J., Pot, A. M. and Eefsting, J. A. (2009). The effects of group living homes on older people with dementia: a comparison with traditional nursing home care. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24, 970978.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Verbeek, H., Zwakhalen, S. M. G., van Rossum, E., Ambergen, T., Kempen, G. I. J. M. and Hamers, J. P. H. (2010). Small-scale, homelike facilities versus regular psychogeriatric nursing home wards: a cross-sectional study into residents’ characteristics. BMC Health Services Research, 10, 30.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Verbeek, H., Zwakhalen, S. M. G., van Rossum, E., Ambergen, T., Kempen, G. I. J. M. and Hamers, J. P. H. (2014). Effects of small-scale, home-like facilities in dementia care on residents’ behavior, and use of physical restraints and psychotropic drugs: a quasi-experimental study. International Psychogeriatrics, 26, 657668.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
White, K., Kendrick, T. and Yardley, L. (2009). Change in self-esteem, self-efficacy and the mood dimensions of depression as potential mediators of the physical activity and depression relationship: exploring the temporal relation of change. Mental Health and Physical Activity, 2, 4452.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yoon, J. Y., Brown, R. L., Bowers, B. J., Sharkey, S. S. and Horn, S. D. (2015). Longitudinal psychological outcomes of the small-scale nursing home model: a latent growth curve zero-inflated poisson model. International Psychogeriatrics, 27, 10091016.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yoon, J. Y. and Kim, H. (2016). The revised index for social engagement in long-term care facilities: a psychometric study. Journal of Nursing Research. Epublished ahead of print, doi: 10.1097/jnr.0000000000000156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 41
Total number of PDF views: 239 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 09th September 2016 - 26th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Impact of the nursing home scale on residents’ social engagement in South Korea
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Impact of the nursing home scale on residents’ social engagement in South Korea
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Impact of the nursing home scale on residents’ social engagement in South Korea
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *