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Future directions for sleep and cognition research in at-risk older adults

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2021

Yeonsu Song*
Affiliation:
School of Nursing, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Laura M. Campbell
Affiliation:
San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, USA Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA
Raeanne C. Moore
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA

Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2021

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