Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-54cdcc668b-v8nsl Total loading time: 0.272 Render date: 2021-03-08T22:28:57.123Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Cognitive screening for early detection of mild cognitive impairment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2020

Ann T. Nguyen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, School of Behavioral Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA
Grace J. Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, School of Behavioral Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article
Type
Commentary
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Alzheimer’s Association. (2018). 2018 Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 14, 367429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brookmeyer, R., Gray, S. and Kawas, C. (1998). Projections of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset. American Journal of Public Health, 88, 13371342.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buschke, H.et al. (1999). Screening for dementia with the memory impairment screen. Neurology, 52, 231.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Evin, G. (2016). Future therapeutics in Alzheimer’s disease: development status of BACE inhibitors. BioDrugs, 30, 173194.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Judge, D., Roberts, J., Khandker, R., Ambegaonkar, B. and Black, C. M. (2019). Physician perceptions about the barriers to prompt diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. International Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 2019, 16.Google ScholarPubMed
Lehrner, J.et al. (2005). Annual conversion to Alzheimer disease among patients with memory complaints attending an outpatient memory clinic: the influence of amnestic mild cognitive impairment and the predictive value of neuropsychological testing. Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, 117, 629635.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liyanage, S. I., Santos, C. and Weaver, D. F. (2018). The hidden variables problem in Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial design. Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, 4, 628635.Google ScholarPubMed
Lopez, C. L.et al. (2017). The Alzheimer’s prevention initiative generation program: evaluating CNP520 efficacy in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease, 4, 242246.Google Scholar
McDonnell, M.et al. (2019). Verbal fluency as a screening tool for mild cognitive impairment. International Psychogeriatrics, 32, 10551062.Google Scholar
McMaster, M., Kim, S., Clare, L., Torres, S. J., D’Este, C. and Anstey, K. J. (2018). Body, Brain, Life for Cognitive Decline (BBL-CD): protocol for a multidomain dementia risk reduction randomized controlled trial for subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 13, 23972406.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mehta, D., Jackson, R., Paul, G., Shi, J. and Sabbagh, M. (2017). Why do trials for Alzheimer’s disease drugs keep failing? A discontinued drug perspective for 2010-2015. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, 26, 735739.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nasreddine, Z. S. (2005). The Montreal Cognitive Assessment, MoCA: a brief screening tool for mild cognitive impairment. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 53, 695699.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oltra-Cucarella, J.et al. (2018). Differential effects of cognition-focused interventions for people with Alzheimer’s disease: a meta-analysis. Neuropsychology, 32, 664.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pinto, T. C.et al. (2018). Is the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) screening superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in the detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) in the elderly? International Psychogeriatrics, 31, 491504.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rodakowski, J., Saghafi, E., Butters, M. A. and Skidmore, E. R. (2015). Non-pharmacological interventions for adults with mild cognitive impairment and early stage dementia: an updated scoping review. Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 43, 3853.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Singer, M., Romero, B., Koenig, E., Förstl, H. and Brunner, H. (2005). Nightmares in patients with Alzheimer’s disease caused by donepezil. Therapeutic effect depends on the time of intake. Der Nervenarzt, 76, 11271128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tariq, S. H., Tumosa, N., Chibnall, J. T., Perry III, M. H. and Morley, J. E. (2006). Comparison of the Saint Louis University mental status examination and the mini-mental state examination for detecting dementia and mild neurocognitive disorder—a pilot study. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 14, 900910.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Xu, W.et al. (2015). Meta-analysis of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, 86, 12991306.Google ScholarPubMed
Yaffe, K., Hoang, T. D., Byers, A. L., Barnes, D. E. and Friedl, K. E. (2014). Lifestyle and health-related risk factors and risk of cognitive aging among older veterans. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 10, S111S121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 28
Total number of PDF views: 57 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 07th October 2020 - 8th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Cognitive screening for early detection of mild cognitive impairment
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Cognitive screening for early detection of mild cognitive impairment
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Cognitive screening for early detection of mild cognitive impairment
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *