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Cognitive factors associated with emotional intelligence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2019

Saanika Venkatesh
Affiliation:
Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Research, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Master of Health Informatics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Corinne E. Fischer
Affiliation:
Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Research, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Email: venkateshs@smh.ca.
Corresponding
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Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2019 

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References

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