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The Cognitive Assessment Battery (CAB): a rapid test of cognitive domains

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 January 2011

Arto Nordlund*
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Mölndal, Sweden
Lisbeth Påhlsson
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Mölndal, Sweden
Christina Holmberg
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Mölndal, Sweden
Karin Lind
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Mölndal, Sweden
Anders Wallin
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Mölndal, Sweden
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Arto Nordlund, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Wallinsgatan 6, SE 431 41 Mölndal, Sweden. Phone: +46 31 343 8698. Email: arto.nordlund@neuro.gu.se.

Abstract

Background: The study aimed to evaluate the Cognitive Assessment Battery (CAB) in a specialist clinic setting in order to find out if it if it could be a supplement to the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) and distinguish between normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia, as well as MCI of different severities.

Methods: CAB consists of six short tests covering the cognitive domains of speed/attention, episodic memory, visuospatial functions, language and executive functions. It takes about 20 minutes to carry out and provides a quick overview of the patient's cognitive profile. Three groups were compared: healthy controls (N = 41), MCI (N = 83) and mild dementia (N = 28).

Results: CAB distinguished very clearly between controls and MCI as well as MCI and dementia. On further analysis CAB also distinguished between MCI of different severities. It also showed to have good sensitivity and specificity for identifying more severe MCI.

Conclusions: CAB seems to be a useful supplement to MMSE and a screening instrument for MCI and dementia with good sensitivity and specificity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2011

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