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Caring for a loved one with Parkinson’s disease: the role of coping styles and relationship quality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 February 2022

Angeline Zhang
Affiliation:
University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia
Leander K. Mitchell
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia
Nancy A. Pachana
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia
Ji Hyun J. Yang
Affiliation:
University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia
Tiffany R. Au
Affiliation:
University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia
Gerard J. Byrne
Affiliation:
University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia Mental Health Service, Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, Herston, QLD, Australia
John D. O’Sullivan
Affiliation:
University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia Department of Neurology, Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, Herston, QLD, Australia
Nadeeka N. Dissanayaka*
Affiliation:
University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia Department of Neurology, Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital, Herston, QLD, Australia
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Nadeeka Dissanayaka, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Building 71/918 Royal Brisbane & Women’s Hospital Campus, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia. Phone: +617 33465577, +61 405715622. Email: n.dissanayaka@uq.edu.au

Abstract

Objective:

Informal carers play an essential role in the care of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). This role, however, is often fraught with difficulties, including emotional, physical, and financial. Coping styles and relationship quality have been hypothesized to influence the impact of stressors. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between carers’ coping style, relationship quality, and carer burden.

Design:

Cross-sectional.

Participants:

Thirty-nine PD patient carer dyads were included in the study.

Measurements:

Participants completed self-rated questionnaires including the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Zarit Burden Interview, and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Inventory.

Results:

Correlational analyses found significant and positive correlation between carer burden and all three coping styles (problem-focused, emotion-focused, and dysfunctional). There was also a moderate association between carers’ perceived relationship quality and satisfaction and carer burden. Regression analyses found that carer’s gender, severity of PD, relationship quality, emotion-focused, and dysfunctional coping styles did not predict carer burden. Conversely, problem-focused coping style predicted carer burden.

Conclusion:

The results highlight that there is no perfect way to react and care for a loved one and serves as important information for practitioners who design and implement interventions.

Type
Original Research Article
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2022

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