Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Impact of recent economic problems on mental health in Ireland

  • Brendan D. Kelly (a1) and Anne M. Doherty (a2)

Extract

The effect, if any, of recent economic problems on mental health in the Republic of Ireland is not fully clear. Rates of suicide increased slightly between 2006 and 2011, and there was a notable increase in 2011 itself. Rates of psychiatric admission continued to fall, however, in line with national mental health policy. Use of sedative and tranquilliser medications (but not antidepressants) increased, although use in the Republic of Ireland remains substantially lower than in Northern Ireland. Mean self-rated happiness in Ireland declined steadily and significantly between 2005 and 2012. In 2009, as economic problems deepened, satisfaction with income replaced satisfaction with health as the strongest correlate of happiness in Ireland. By 2011/12, however, none of the traditional correlates of happiness retained an independent association with happiness. Overall, these trends suggest that suicide prevention strategies will be increasingly important for Ireland in future years. Active labour-market programmes to address unemployment may also play an important role in suicide prevention. Rates of mental illness and medication usage in the community merit further study. The solution to declining happiness levels may elude purposive description but this trend is likely to reverse as Ireland's economic prospects improve.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Impact of recent economic problems on mental health in Ireland
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Impact of recent economic problems on mental health in Ireland
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Impact of recent economic problems on mental health in Ireland
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

References

Hide All
Central Statistics Office (2012) Vital Statistics: Fourth Quarter and Yearly Summary, 2011. The Stationery Office.
Corcoran, P. & Arensman, E. (2011) Suicide and employment during Ireland's Celtic Tiger economy. European Journal of Public Health, 21, 209214
Daly, A. & Walsh, D. (2012) HRB Statistics Series 18: Activities of Irish Psychiatric Units and Hospitals 2011. Health Research Board.
Doherty, A. M. & Kelly, B. D. (2013) When Irish eyes are smiling: income and happiness in Ireland, 2003–2009. Irish Journal of Medical Science, 182, 113119.
Dorn, D., Fischer, J. A. V., Kirchgassner, G., et al (2007) Is it culture or democracy? The impact of democracy and culture on happiness. Social Indicators Research, 82, 505526.
Expert Group on Mental Health Policy (2006) A Vision for Change. The Stationery Office.
Jowell, R. & Central Coordinating Team (2007) European Social Survey 2006/2007: Technical Report City University.
Lewis, M. (2011) When Irish eyes are crying. Vanity Fair, March.
McElwee, O. (2009) Depression and stress due to economic hardship. Forum, 26, 2528.
National Advisory Committee on Drugs & Public Health Information and Research Branch (2012) Drug Use in Ireland and Northern Ireland: First Results from the 2010/2011 Drug Prevalence Survey. National Advisory Committee on Drugs & Public Health Information and Research Branch.
National Office for Suicide Prevention (2012) Annual Report 2011. Health Service Executive.
Stuckler, D., Basu, S., Suhrcke, M., et al (2009) The public health effect of economic crises and alternative policy responses in Europe: an empirical analysis. Lancet, 374, 315323.

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Impact of recent economic problems on mental health in Ireland

  • Brendan D. Kelly (a1) and Anne M. Doherty (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.

Impact of recent economic problems on mental health in Ireland

  • Brendan D. Kelly (a1) and Anne M. Doherty (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *