Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-whwnh Total loading time: 0.358 Render date: 2022-07-07T01:24:26.191Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Prosecutor v. Mladić (U.N. Int'l Residual Mechanism Crim. Tribunals App. Chamber)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 October 2021

Steven Arrigg Koh*
Affiliation:
Steven Arrigg Koh is the Marianne D. Short and Ray Skowyra Sesquicentennial Assistant Professor of Law at Boston College Law School. Previously, he served as Trial Attorney in the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, as Associate Legal Officer in Trial Chamber III at the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (Prosecutor v. Radovan Karadžic' trial), and as a Visiting Professional in the Presidency of the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Extract

On June 8, 2021, the UN International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (Mechanism) Appeals Chamber delivered its appeals judgment in Prosecutor v. Ratko Mladić. The judgment affirmed the 2017 trial judgment of Trial Chamber I of the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), which convicted Mladić, the Bosnian Serb commander, of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes during the war in Bosnia between 1992 and 1995, as well as affirming his sentence of life imprisonment. This constituted Mladić's final appeal, opening the door for his assignment to a prison somewhere in Europe.

Type
International Legal Documents
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The American Society of International Law

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 See generally Steven Arrigg Koh, Geography and Justice: Why Prison Location Matters in U.S. and International Theories of Criminal Punishment, 47 Vand. J. Transnat'l L. 1267 (2013) (describing the process whereby international convicts are assigned to a prison in Europe or Africa).

2 U.N. Int'l Residual Mechanism for Crim. Tribunals, About, https://www.irmct.org/en/about; id., Functions of the Mechanism, https://www.irmct.org/en/about/functions.

4 Susana SaCouto, Victim Participation at the International Criminal Court and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia: A Feminist Project, 18 Mich. J. Gender & L. 297 (2012).

5 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/may/26/ratko-mladic-serbia-eu-membership; see also Steven Arrigg Koh, Marbury Moments, 54 Colum. J. Transnat'l L. 116 (2015) (describing how young courts build institutional legitimacy during their early years).

6 Ian Traynor, Ratko Mladic arrested: what it means for Serbia's EU membership, The Guardian (May 26, 2011), https://www.icc-cpi.int/resource-library/documents/rs-eng.pdf.

8 Linda E. Carter, The Principle of Complementarity and the International Criminal Court: The Role of Ne Bis in Idem, 8 Santa Clara J. Int'l L. 165 (2010), https://scholarlycommons.pacific.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1182&context=facultyarticles.

9 See Steven Arrigg Koh, Core Criminal Procedure, 105 Minn. L. Rev. 251, 314-16 (2020) (discussing the history of establishment of such investigative mechanisms).

10 See generally Steven Arrigg Koh, Foreign Affairs Prosecutions, 94 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 340 (2019) (describing foreign affairs prosecutions and their intersection with international criminal legal mechanisms); Steven Arrigg Koh, The Criminalization of Foreign Relations. 90 FORDHAM L. REV. (forthcoming 2021) (describing the use of extraterritorial law enforcement policy in U.S. foreign relations).

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Prosecutor v. Mladić (U.N. Int'l Residual Mechanism Crim. Tribunals App. Chamber)
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Prosecutor v. Mladić (U.N. Int'l Residual Mechanism Crim. Tribunals App. Chamber)
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Prosecutor v. Mladić (U.N. Int'l Residual Mechanism Crim. Tribunals App. Chamber)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *