Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The Civil Rights Origins of Illegal Immigration

  • Mae M. Ngai (a1)

Abstract

The present immigration system is based on a core paradox. The method of allocating visas for the admission of permanent residents is based on principles of equality and fairness because all countries have the same quota. Yet visa demand varies widely. The principle of formal equality has disparate effects, being inclusionary for some and exclusionary for others. Four countries persistently max out on their caps—China, India, Mexico, and the Philippines—leading to long waits, easily ten to twenty years or more, and hence pressures for unlawful entry. The system generates an ever-larger caste-population of unauthorized immigrants.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The Civil Rights Origins of Illegal Immigration
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The Civil Rights Origins of Illegal Immigration
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The Civil Rights Origins of Illegal Immigration
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All

NOTES

1. Jeffrey Passel, “A Portrait of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States,” Pew Hispanic Research Center, http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1190/portrait-unauthorized-immigrants-states (accessed August 14, 2009).

2. US Department of State, Visa Bulletin Vol. 9, No. 14, November 2009, http://www.travel.state.gov/visa/frvi/bulletin/bulletin_4576.html (last accessed June 8, 2010).

3. US Department of State, Archived Visa Bulletins, 2002–2009, http://www.travel.state.gov/visa/frvi/bulletin/bulletin_1770.html (last accessed June 8, 2010).

4. The following discussion is based on Ngai, Mae M., “‘The Unlovely Residue of Outworn Prejudices’: The Hart-Celler Act of 1965 and the Politics of Immigration Reform,” in Americanism: New Perspectives on the History of an Ideal, ed. Kazin, Michael and McCartin, Joseph (Chapel Hill, NC, 2006).

5. Handlin, Oscar, “The Immigration Fight has Just Begun,” Commentary 14(July 1952).

6. Ngai, Mae M., “The Lost Immigration Debate,” Boston Review, September/October (2009).

7. Johnson quoted in Ngai, Mae M., Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Princeton, NJ, 2004), 259.

8. Ngai, Impossible Subjects, 261. Except where otherwise noted the following discussion draws from Impossible Subjects.

9. Passel, “Portrait of Unauthorized Immigrants.”

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

The Civil Rights Origins of Illegal Immigration

  • Mae M. Ngai (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.