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Vertical distribution of phlebotomine sandflies in two habitats in marigat leishmaniases endemic focus, baringo district, Kenya

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

M. Basimike
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
Mutuku J. Mutinga
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
C. M. Mutero
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract

Studies on the vertical distribution of phlebotomine sandflies were carried out at Marigat (Kenya) at determined heights above ground level in both wooded and open fields. Traps set up at different heights from 0–11 m (in wooded area) and 0–9 m (in open field), showed a clear vertical zonation of sandflies as large numbers were collected between 0–7 m in the first site and 0–4 m in the second ones. Among the nine sandfly species collected, Sergentomyia bedfordi Newstead and S. antennatus Newstead were the only species recorded at a height of 11 m above the ground and the commonest sandflies at all studied heights. Overall, more sandflies were collected from the wooded area than the open field. The relationships between the sandfly relative abundance and their heights of flight above the ground showed significant negative correlation coefficients.

Résumé

Des études sur la distribution verticale des phlébotomes ont été menées dans deux zones différentes dans la Localité de Marigat (Kenya). Dans la région boisée, les pièges ‘collant’ placés du sol jusqu'à onze mètres ont défini la zone de vol comme étant comprise entre le niveau du sol (O mètre) et sept mètres au-dessus du sol. Tandis que dans la région déboisée (endroit ouvert), les pièges installés de zéro jusqu'à neuf métres ont déterminé la zone de vol comme étant située entre zéro et quatre mètres au-dessus du sol. Parmi les neuf espèces de phlébotomes rencontrées dans la Localité de Marigat, seules Sergentomyia bedfordi et S. antennatus ont été collectées jusqu'à onze métres au-dessus du sol. Les deux espèces étant aussi les plus communes à toutes les hauteurs examinées. Dans l'ensemble, la zone boisée renfermait plus de phlébotomes par rapport à l'endroit ouvert. Le rapport entre l'abondance relative des phlébotomes et leur distance de vol au-dessus du sol a présenté un coefficient de correlation négatif hautement significatif.

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Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 1989

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