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The use of permethrin-impregnated wall cloth (Mbu cloth) for control of vectors of malaria and leishmaniases in Kenya — I. Effect on mosquito populations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

Mutuku J. Mutinga
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
Clifford M. Mutero
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
Mulenda Basimike
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
Augustine M. Ngindu
Affiliation:
Division of Vector Borne Diseases, Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 20750, Nairobi

Abstract

The impact of a new design of permethrin-impregnated wall cloth (“Mbu” (mosquito) cloth) on mosquito populations was assessed in Marigat area of Baringo District, Kenya. The cloth was fitted in 2000 houses. Mosquito relative density, species composition and the proportion of blood-fed females before and during the use of the Mbu cloth were monitored by hand catch, exit trap and CDC light trap catches. The common mosquito species were Culex quinquefasciatus, Mansonia uniformis, Anopheles gambiae sensu lato and An. funestus. A statistically significant decline in the mosquito population was observed following the introduction of the cloth. The decline was particularly high during the first and second six month impregnation cycles when it ranged between 43 and 94% indoors. C. quinquefasciatus was less affected by the cloth than other species, while M. uniformis apparently avoided treated houses. An. gambiae s.I. and An. funestus were collected in extremely low numbers during the post-treatment period. The Mbu cloth and other permethrin impregnated wall-hanging fabrics constitute a novel way Of controlling mosquitoes and malaria in rural communities.

Résumé

L'effet d'un nouveau modèle d'écran traité à la permethrine (“Mbu” (moustique) cloth) sur les populations des moustiques a été évalué dans la localité de Marigat, District de Baringo au Kenya. Les écrans ónt été fixes dans 2000 maisons. La densité relative des moustiques, la composition spécifique et la proportion des femelles nourries au sang avant et pendant l'emploi d'écran étaient régulièrément surveillées en utilisant la technique de capture à la main, le piège fenétre, et le piège lumineux (CDC). Les espèces de moustiques les plus rencontrées étaient Culex quinquefasciatus, Mansonia uniformis, Anopheles gambiae s.I. et An. funestus. Une reduction statistiquement significative des populations de moustiques était observée après l'introduction d'écran. Elle était particulièrement élevée pendant le premier et le second cycles de traitement. Cette reduction se rangeait entre 43 et 94% (à l'intérieur des maisons). C. quinquefasciatus était moins affecté par l'écran, alors que M. uniformis apparamment évitait les maisons traitées. An. gambiae s.I. et An. funestus ont été extremment peu attrapés pendant la période d'après traitement. L'écran (Mbu cloth) et autres matériaux impregnés à la permethrine constituent un nouveau moyen pour controller les moustiques et le paludisme dans les communautés rurales.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 1992

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