Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-s5ss2 Total loading time: 0.252 Render date: 2021-03-05T05:15:06.883Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Solena amplexicaulis (Cucurbitaceae) flower surface wax influencing attraction of a generalist insect herbivore, Aulacophora foveicollis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2016

Amarnath Karmakar
Affiliation:
Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal, India
Anandamay Barik
Affiliation:
Ecology Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal, India
Corresponding

Abstract

Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas causes economic losses to creeping cucumber [Solena amplexicaulis (Lam.) Gandhi] growers in India and Bangladesh because adults feed on the leaves and flowers causing death of the plant. The insect is a generalist herbivore as it also causes damage to pumpkin, bottle gourd, sponge-gourd and gac fruit production by feeding on leaves and flowers of these plants. At present, insects are controlled with insecticides, which are harmful to human health and the environment. We studied the behavioural responses of adult A. foveicollis to flower surface waxes and synthetic compounds mimicking flower surface waxes to determine their potential for monitoring this pest. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) analyses of S. amplexicaulis flower (50 g) surface waxes indicated presence of 17.9 and 3.1 mg alkanes and free fatty acids, respectively. Seventeen n-alkanes from n-C15 to n-C34 and 16 free fatty acids from C10:0 to C22:0 were detected in the flower surface waxes. Heptacosane was predominant among n-alkanes representing 2748.1 µg; whereas, pentadecanoic acid was the major fatty acid accounting for 466.6 µg. Aulacophora foveicollis were attracted to the flower surface waxes at concentrations of 4 to 8 μg/ml, as demonstrated by a Y-tube olfactometer bioassay. Using a dose response bioassay, the insect was shown to be attracted to individual synthetic pentadecane, heptacosane, nonacosane, undecanoic acid and nonadecanoic acid at 0.70, 0.70, 1.20, 1.60 and 1.40 µg/ml, respectively. The insect displayed highest attraction to a synthetic mixture of 0.70, 1.23, 0.77, 0.84, 0.94 and 0.74 µg/ml of pentadecane, heptacosane, nonacosane, undecanoic acid, lauric acid and nonadecanoic acid, respectively, and hence, this combination might be used for insect pest management such as in baited traps.

Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © icipe 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Addesso, K. M., McAuslane, H. J. and Alborn, H. T. (2011) Attraction of pepper weevil to volatiles from damaged pepper plants. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 138, 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adhikary, P., Mukherjee, A. and Barik, A. (2014) Role of surface wax alkanes from Lathyrus sativus L. seeds for attraction of Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Journal of Stored Products Research 59, 113119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bahlai, C. A., Welsman, J. A., Macleod, E. C., Schaafsma, A. W., Hallett, R. H. and Sears, M. K. (2008) Role of visual and olfactory cues from agricultural hedgerows in the orientation behavior of multicolored Asian lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Environmental Entomology 37, 973979.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, E. A. (1982) Chemistry and morphology of plant epicuticular waxes, pp. 139165. In The Plant Cuticle (edited by Cutler, D. F., Alvin, K. L. and Price, C. E.). Academic Press, London.Google Scholar
Bruce, T. J. A. and Pickett, J. A. (2011) Perception of plant volatile blends by herbivorous insects − Finding the right mix. Phytochemistry 72, 16051611.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bruce, T. J. A., Wadhams, L. J. and Woodcock, C. M. (2005) Insect host location: a volatile situation. Trends in Plant Science 10, 269274.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burdi, D. K., Samejo, M. Q., Bhanger, M. I. and Khan, K. M. (2007) Fatty acid composition of Abies pindrow (West Himalayan fir). Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 20, 1519.Google Scholar
Demir, R. and Cakmak, O. (2007) Investigation on fatty acids in leaves, stems and fruits of some species of Medicago . International Journal of Agricultural Biology 9, 934936.Google Scholar
Downer, R. G. H. (1985) Lipid metabolism, pp. 77113. In Comprehensive Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology (edited by Kerkut, G. A. and Gilbert, L. I.), vol. 10. Pergamon, Oxford, UK.Google Scholar
Dutton, A., Mattiacci, L. and Dorn, S. (2000) Plant-derived semiochemicals as contact host location stimuli for a parasitoid of leafminers. Journal of Chemical Ecology 26, 22592273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eigenbrode, S. D. and Espelie, K. E. (1995) Effects of plant epicuticular lipids on insect herbivores. Annual Review of Entomology 40, 171194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Espelie, K. E., Bernays, E. A. and Brown, J. J. (1991) Plant and insect cuticular lipids serve as behavioural cues for insects. Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 17, 223233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jetter, R., Schaffer, S. and Riederer, M. (2000) Leaf cuticular waxes are arranged in chemically and mechanically distinct layers: evidence from Prunus laurocerasus L. Plant, Cell and Environment 23, 619628.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karthika, K. and Paulsamy, S. (2012) Antibacterial potential of traditional plant species Solena amplexicaulis (Lam.) Gandhi against certain human pathogens. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research 5, 255257.Google Scholar
Karthika, K. and Paulsamy, S. (2014) Phytochemical profiling of leaf, stem, and tuber parts of Solena amplexicaulis (Lam.) Gandhi using GC-MS. International Scholarly Research Notices http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/567409.Google Scholar
Karthika, K., Paulsamy, S. and Jamuna, S. (2012) Evaluation of in vitro antioxidant potential of methanolic leaf and stem extracts of Solena amplexicaulis (Lam.) Gandhi. Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research 4, 32543258.Google Scholar
Khan, M. M. H., Alam, M. Z. and Rahaman, M. M. (2011) Host preference of red pumpkin beetle in a choice test under net case condition. Bangladesh Journal of Zoology 39, 231234.Google Scholar
Laredo, M. A., Simpson, G. D., Minson, D. J. and Orpin, C. G. (1991) The potential for using n-alkanes in tropical forages as a marker for the determination of dry matter by grazing ruminants. The Journal of Agricultural Science 117, 355361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, G. and Ishikawa, Y. (2006) Leaf epicuticular wax chemicals of the Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica as oviposition stimulants for Ostrinia latipennis . Journal of Chemical Ecology 32, 595604.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maffei, M., Badino, S. and Bossi, S. (2004) Chemotaxonomic significance of leaf wax n-alkanes in the Pinales (Coniferales). Journal of Biological Research 1, 319.Google Scholar
Magalhães, D. M., Borges, M., Laumann, R. A., Sujii, E. R., Mayon, P., Caulfield, J. C., Midega, C. A. O., Khan, Z. R., Pickett, J. A., Birkett, M. A. and Blassioli-Moraes, M. C. (2012) Semiochemicals from herbivory induced cotton plants enhance the foraging behaviour of the cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis . Journal of Chemical Ecology 38, 15281538.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Malik, U. and Barik, A. (2015) Free fatty acids from the weed, Polygonum orientale leaves for attraction of the potential biocontrol agent, Galerucella placida (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Biocontrol Science and Technology 25, 593607.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malossini, F., Bovolenta, S., Piasentier, E. and Valentinotti, M. (1994) Variability of n-alkane content in a natural pasture and in faeces of grazing dairy cows. Animal Feed Science and Technology 50, 113122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Manosalva, L., Pardo, F., Perich, F., Mutis, A., Parra, L., Ortega, F., Isaacs, R. and Quiroz, A. (2011) Behavioral responses of clover root borer to long-chain fatty acids from young red clover (Trifolium pratense) roots. Environmental Entomology 40, 399404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Medina, E., Aguiar, G., Gomez, M., Aranda, J., Medina, J. D. and Winter, K. (2006) Taxonomic significance of the epicuticular wax composition in species of the genus Clusia from Panama. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 34, 319326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morrison, W. R. and Smith, L. M. (1964) Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters and dimethylacetals from lipids with boron fluoride-methanol. Journal of Lipid Research 5, 600608.Google Scholar
Muller, C. (2006) Plant–insect interactions on cuticular surfaces, pp. 398422. In Biology of the Plant Cuticle (edited by Riederer, M. and Muller, C.). Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parameshwar, H., Narsimha Reddy, Y., Ravi Kumar, B. and Krishna Mohan, G. (2010) Hepatoprotective effect of Solena amplexicaulis (tuber) on acute carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity. International Journal of Pharmacy and Technology 2, 375384.Google Scholar
Piasentier, E., Bovolenta, S. and Malossini, F. (2000) The n-alkane concentrations in buds and leaves of browsed broadleaf trees. The Journal of Agricultural Science 135, 311320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rahaman, M. A. and Prodhan, M. D. H. (2007) Effects of net barrier and synthetic pesticides on red pumpkin beetle and yield of cucumber. International Journal of Sustainable Crop Production 2, 3034.Google Scholar
Rostás, M. and Wölfling, M. (2009) Caterpillar footprints as host location kairomones for Cotesia marginiventris: persistence and chemical nature. Journal of Chemical Ecology 35, 2027.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roy, N. and Barik, A. (2012) Alkanes used for host recognition by the arctiid moth, Diacrisia casignetum Kollar. Journal of Entomological Research 36, 345350.Google Scholar
Santos, L. C., Dokkedal, A. L., Sannomiya, M., Soares, M. C. P. and Vilegas, W. (2005) n-Alkanes from Paepalanthus Mart. species (Eriocaulaceae). Acta Botanica Brasilica 19, 727732.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarkar, N. and Barik, A. (2014) Role of alkanes from bitter gourd flower surface waxes as allelochemicals in olfactory responses of Epilachna dodecastigma (Wied.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Allelopathy Journal 33, 4352.Google Scholar
Sarkar, N. and Barik, A. (2015) Free fatty acids from Momordica charantia L. flower surface waxes influencing attraction of Epilachna dodecastigma (Wied.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). International Journal of Pest Management 61, 4753.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarkar, N., Malik, U. and Barik, A. (2014) n-alkanes in epicuticular waxes of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. leaves. Acta Botanica Gallica 161, 373377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarkar, N., Mukherjee, A. and Barik, A. (2013a) Long-chain alkanes: allelochemicals for host location by the insect pest, Epilachna dodecastigma (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Applied Entomology and Zoology 48, 171179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarkar, N., Mukherjee, A. and Barik, A. (2013b) Olfactory responses of Epilachna dodecastigma (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to long-chain fatty acids from Momordica charantia leaves. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 7, 339348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarkar, N., Mukherjee, A. and Barik, A. (2015) Attraction of Epilachna dodecastigma (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to Momordica charantia (Cucurbitaceae) leaf volatiles. The Canadian Entomologist 147, 169180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schiestl, F. P., Ayasse, M., Paulus, H. F., Lofstedt, C., Hansson, B. S., Ibarra, F. and Francke, W. (1999) Orchid pollination by sexual swindle. Nature 399, 421422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schoonhoven, L. M., Van Loon, J. J. A. and Dicke, M. (2005) Insect-Plant Biology. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 421 pp.Google Scholar
Silk, P. J., Ryall, K., Mayo, P., MaGee, D. I., Leclair, G., Fidgen, J., Lavallee, R., Price, J. and McConaghy, J. (2015) A biologically active analog of the sex pheromone of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis . Journal of Chemical Ecology 41, 294302.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Singh, D. and Gill, C. K. (1979) Estimation of losses in growth and yield of muskmelon due to Aulacophora foveicollis (Lucas). Indian Journal of Entomology 44, 294295.Google Scholar
Sinha, S. N. and Chakrabarti, A. K. (1983) Effect of seed treatment with carbofuran on the incidence of red pumpkin beetle, Rhaphidopalpa foveicollis (Lucas) on cucurbits. Indian Journal of Entomology 45, 145151.Google Scholar
Stanley-Samuelson, D. W., Jurenka, R. A., Cripps, C., Blomquist, G. J. and de Renobales, M. (1988) Fatty acids in insects: composition, metabolism, and biological significance. Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 9, 133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tasin, M., Anfora, G., Ioriatti, C., Carlin, S., De Cristofaro, A., Schmidt, S., Bengtsson, M., Versini, G. and Witzgall, P. (2005) Antennal and behavioural responses of grapevine moth Lobesia botrana females to volatiles from grapevine. Journal of Chemical Ecology 31, 7787.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Venkateshwarlu, E., Raghuram Reddy, A., Goverdhan, P., Swapna Rani, K. and Jayapal Reddy, G. (2011) In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity of methanolic extract of Solena amplexicaulis (whole plant). International Journal of Pharmacy and Biological Sciences 1, 522533.Google Scholar
Warriar, P. K., Nambiar, V. P. K. and Ramankutty, C. (eds) (1993) Indian Medicinal Plants: A Compendium of 500 species (volume 5), 592 pp. Orient Longman, India.Google Scholar
Youngman, R. R. and Baker, T. C. (1989) Host odor mediated response of female navel orangeworm moths (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) to black and white sticky traps. Journal of Economic Entomology 82, 13391343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Karmakar Supplementary Material

Table 1

File 82 KB

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 8
Total number of PDF views: 67 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 5th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Solena amplexicaulis (Cucurbitaceae) flower surface wax influencing attraction of a generalist insect herbivore, Aulacophora foveicollis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Solena amplexicaulis (Cucurbitaceae) flower surface wax influencing attraction of a generalist insect herbivore, Aulacophora foveicollis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Solena amplexicaulis (Cucurbitaceae) flower surface wax influencing attraction of a generalist insect herbivore, Aulacophora foveicollis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *