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Phytophagy of Sergentomyia ingrami—I. Feeding rates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

J. B. Kaddu
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
M. J. Mutinga
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
S. Nokoe
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
R. M. Musyoki
Affiliation:
The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P. O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract

The ability of a Kenyan sandfly species, Sergentomyia ingrami, to feed on various species of native or indigenous and exotic or introduced plants of Kenya was investigated using the Anthrone test. Some flies contained more sugar than others when they were tested after exposure to the plants.

Résumé

Le pouvoir d'un phlébotome Kenyan Sergentomyia ingrami de se nourrir sur diverses espéces de plantes indigenes et exotiques du Kenya était étudié en utilisant le test d'Anthrone. Quelques phlébotomes contenaient plus de sucre que les autres lorsqu'ils étaient testés après être exposés aux plantes.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 1992

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References

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