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Leishmania in Kenyan Phlebotomine Sandflies—V. Leishmania aethiopica in the Oesophagus of Phlebotomus pedifer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

J. B. Kaddu
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
M. J. Mutinga
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
M. Chimtawi
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
B. M. Okot-Kotber
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
M. P. Nyamori
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya
R. Musyoki
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), P.O. Box 30772, Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract

Ultrastructural studies were carried out on biochemically confirmed Leishmania aethiopica in the oesophagus of naturally-infected, wild-caught sandflies, Phlebotomus pedifer. The parasites with an infection rate of 2.8% were either free in thelumen or attached to the cuticular lining by hemidesmosomes. Previously undescribed pseudopodia-like projections which seemed to enhance the anchorage of L. aethiopica in the oesophagus were observed.

Résumé

Des études ultrastructurales ont été menées sur Leishmania aethiopica reconnue biochemiquement dans l'oesophage des mouches, Phlebotomus pedifer sauvages capturées et infectées naturellement. Les parasites ayant un taux d'infection de 2.8% étaient libres dans le lumen ou étaient attachés au cuticule á travers les hemidesmosomes.

Précedemment des projections des pseudopodes non encore décrites qui semblaient exagérer l'ancrage de L. aethiopica dans l'oesophage étaient observées.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 1988

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