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Utilization patterns of diagnostic imaging across the late life course: A population-based study in Ontario, Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2008

Li Wang
Affiliation:
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Jason X. Nie
Affiliation:
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
C. Shawn Tracy
Affiliation:
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Rahim Moineddin
Affiliation:
University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Ross E. G. Upshur
Affiliation:
University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Abstract

Objectives: Due to the aging baby boom population, utilization rates of diagnostic imaging (i.e., X-ray, CT, and MRI scanning) have risen rapidly relative to other health services. The aim of this study is to investigate the utilization patterns of outpatient diagnostic imaging services (X-ray, CT, and MRI) across the late life course (65 years and older).

Methods: A population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted for the period April 1, 2005, to March 31, 2006. All Ontario residents aged 65+ and eligible for government health insurance were included in the analysis.

Results: Utilization of diagnostic imaging followed an inverted U-pattern: increasing with advancing age, peaking in the 80–84 age group for CT scans and in the 70–74 age group for MRI and X-rays, and then declining in the later years. Overall, females received significantly more X-rays than males (p < .01), but males received significantly more CT and MRI scans (p < .01). A small proportion of high-users of radiology services accounted for a large proportion of overall utilization. Finally, our analysis revealed that a disproportionately large proportion of high-users of MRI services were in the highest SES quintile. No SES differences were observed for X-ray or CT scans.

Conclusions: Population aging will lead to increased demand for healthcare services. Utilization of outpatient diagnostic imaging services is associated with age, gender, and SES. Given the increasing demand and the limited resources available, there may be a need for programs to target underserved populations to reduce remediable inequities. Whereas patient-level decisions regarding the use of diagnostic imaging are rightfully determined on the basis of clinical factors, allocation decisions should also be informed by the ethical principles of equity and fairness.

Type
GENERAL ESSAYS
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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