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PP83 Early Assessment Of Proof-Of-Problem To Guide Health Innovation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2019

Abstract

Introduction:

In the fast-paced world of health technology innovation, early health technology assessment (HTA) gained recognition as a tool to help prioritize and steer the development of those innovations that potentially add value. Much of early HTA seems technology-driven; a certain novel technology is introduced and the focus is on assessing its expected cost-effectiveness. We argue that a first step in assessing innovation would be to derive proof-of-problem through combining evidence from literature and stakeholder engagement. We applied this approach to a novel surgical instrument aimed to facilitate meniscus surgery.

Methods:

First, we identified a broad scope of stakeholders in meniscus surgery (i.e. meniscectomy). Through interviewing them we derived key problems in meniscectomy as-is, and determined which outcomes matter most. We used stakeholder and literature input to quantify the room for improvement in current meniscectomy. Together with stakeholders we interpreted the problem quantification and conducted an early assessment of the proposed surgical innovation. Finally, we made use of this early stakeholder engagement to uncover possible barriers and facilitators to the innovation's implementation.

Results:

While all stakeholders were enthusiastic about the innovation, there was a shared perception that there is little room for improvement in meniscectomy at present. Put differently; the innovation poses a great solution to problems that may not exist. In addition, by involving a broad range of stakeholders we were able to identify barriers and facilitators to future implementation early on, such as surgeons’ preferences.

Conclusions:

We conclude that the innovation's value may lie with applications outside of meniscus surgery. Regarding methodology, we showed how a shift of focus from solution to problem definition provides a different perspective on an innovation's potential value, borne out of needs not currently met. In doing so, early HTA is in a unique position to help navigate the stream of health technology innovation before actual development of the innovation.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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