Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-d5zgf Total loading time: 1.055 Render date: 2021-03-08T05:14:46.473Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

In the Land of the International

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 April 2016

Samera Esmeir
Affiliation:
Department of Rhetoric, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, Calif.; e-mail: samera@berkeley.edu
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

The preamble to the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights establishes a peculiar hierarchy between rebellion and human rights. The preamble affirms that “whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law.” According to the declaration, rebellion against oppression and tyranny is an act that individuals can only be compelled to pursue, and only once other choices are exhausted. Rebellion descends upon the oppressed “man” from without and he cannot refuse it. It is a force that takes over desperate men. Human rights, in turn, police against rebellion by prevailing in the law. They are the preferred weapon against two extremes: oppression and rebellion. And if rebellion is the space of compelled political action, human rights is the space of uncompelled, free, and authentic action against oppression and tyranny.

Type
Roundtable
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 United Nations, “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” 10 December 1948, http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/.

2 This question is obviously indebted to Talal Asad's work on the powers of human rights, the human, and the secular. Asad, Talal, Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2003)Google Scholar.

3 Arendt, Hannah, Imperialism: Part Two of the Origins of Totalitarianism (New York: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1994), 178–79Google Scholar.

4 Ibid., 177–78.

Ibid

5 Wheaton, Henry, Elements of International Law (Boston: Little Brown and Company, 1866)Google Scholar.

6 Lyons, F. S. L., Internationalism in Europe: 1815–1914 (Leiden: Sythoff, 1963)Google Scholar.

7 Anghie, Anthony, Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), 133Google Scholar. On the proliferation of international governing institutions, see Rajagopal, Balakrishnan, International Law from Below: Development, Social Movements and Third World Resistance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

8 See “Map of OHCHR Field Presences,” United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner, accessed 21 December 2015, http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Countries/Pages/MapOfficesIndex.aspx.

9 The reference here is to the International Workingmen Association and to the different Internationals that followed it.

10 Bentham, Jeremy, Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (Mineola, N.Y.: Dover Publications, 2007)Google Scholar.

11 Bull, Hadley and Watson, Adam, The Expansion of International Society (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985)Google Scholar.

12 Scott, David, Omens of Adversity: Tragedy, Time, Memory, Justice (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2014), 37Google Scholar.

13 “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.”

14 See Esmeir, Samera, Juridical Humanity: A Colonial History (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2012)Google Scholar.

15 Grotius, Hugo, The Free Sea, ed. Armitage, David (Indianapolis, Ind.: Liberty Fund, 2004)Google Scholar.

16 Scott, James, The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2009), 293–94Google ScholarPubMed.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 12
Total number of PDF views: 158 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 8th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

In the Land of the International
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

In the Land of the International
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

In the Land of the International
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *