Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-z4vvc Total loading time: 0.33 Render date: 2021-03-04T03:19:31.238Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The Drowned, the Saved, and the Forgotten: Genocide Survivors and Modern Humanitarianism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 April 2016

Keith David Watenpaugh
Affiliation:
Human Rights Studies Program, University of California, Davis, Davis, Calif.; e-mail: kwatenpaugh@ucdavis
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

Dominant narratives of the Eastern Mediterranean's 20th century exclude the study of Western humanitarianism and refugee survivors of the 1915 genocide of the Ottoman Armenians. Reasons for this exclusion abound. At the forefront is the abject nature of the human beings who populate that history, something which often induces revulsion on the part of historians in the present: these were people who left little of the appealing and elegant traces left by a Beiruti journalist, a Damascene urban notable, or an elite Constantinopolitan feminist. They appear as an undifferentiated mass of survivors of intense violence, disease, and starvation who are bereft of any agency; slaves, and serially raped and pregnant teenagers in bureaucratic documents stored at the League of Nations archive or packs of feral emaciated street children roving the narrow alleyways of Aleppo's old city in the paternalistic memoirs of Western relief workers—usually American or Scandinavian female healthcare professionals. Their own voices are obscured, showing up in the occasional self-published autobiography written by an elderly genocide survivor for his grandchildren, or in handwritten accounts and letters in lost dialects inherited by descendants unable to read them.

Type
Roundtable
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 Edward R. Stoerer, “Report of Constantinople Office 1 June 1916–May 1917,” Rockefeller Archive Center–Rockefeller Foundation, International Projects 1:100. Box 76, folder 719, p. 4.

2 Archives of the League of Nations, United Nations Organization, Geneva, Records of the Nansen International Refugee Office, 1920–1947, Registers of Inmates of the Armenian Orphanage in Aleppo, 1922–1930, 4 vols.

3 Elliot, Mabel E., Beginning Again at Ararat (New York: Fleming H. Revell, 1924)Google Scholar.

4 Panian, Karnig, Goodbye, Antoura: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2015)Google Scholar.

5 Kerr, Stanley E., The Lions of Marash: Personal Experiences with American Near East Relief, 1919–1922 (Albany, N.Y.: SUNY Press, 1973)Google Scholar.

6 As an example of this style of denialist literature, see McCarthy, Justin, The Turk in America: The Creation of an Enduring Prejudice (Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, 2010)Google Scholar.

7 Agamben, Giorgio, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1998)Google Scholar.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 35
Total number of PDF views: 180 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 4th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Drowned, the Saved, and the Forgotten: Genocide Survivors and Modern Humanitarianism
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Drowned, the Saved, and the Forgotten: Genocide Survivors and Modern Humanitarianism
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Drowned, the Saved, and the Forgotten: Genocide Survivors and Modern Humanitarianism
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *