Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE OTTOMAN BALKANS: EDUCATION, REFORM, AND FAILED CONVERSIONS, 1819–1967

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2015

Extract

The last few decades have seen a rise in the number of studies on Christian missions. These studies are located within a wide range of fields and are written from different perspectives. They tend to abide by national boundaries and to focus on mission organizations and missionaries, not least because of the availability of source material in Western languages. Recent historiography on Christian missions to the Middle East, however, has seen a profound change in approach, methodology, and sources. We can locate three main shifts: a national to a transnational approach, a reevaluation of local agency, and a new emphasis on unintended consequences.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 See Sharkey, Heather J., ed., Cultural Conversions: Unexpected Consequences of Christian Missionary Encounters in the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia (Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 2013)Google Scholar; Fleischmann, Ellen, “Living in an ‘Isle of Safety’: The Sidon Female Seminary in World War I and the Constraints of Compassion,” Jerusalem Quarterly 56–57 (2013–14): 4051Google Scholar; Fleischmann, , “‘Under an American Roof’: The Beginnings of the American Junior College for Women in Beirut,” Arab Studies Journal 17 (2009): 6284Google Scholar; Hauser, Julia, German Religious Women in Late Ottoman Beirut: Competing Missions (Leiden: Brill, 2015)Google Scholar; and Berg, Heleen Murre-van Den, ed., New Faith in Ancient Lands: Western Missions in the Middle East in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries (Leiden: Brill, 2006)Google Scholar.

2 Rodogno, Davide, Struck, Berhard, and Vogel, Jacob, introduction to Shaping the Transnational Sphere: Experts, Networks and Issues from the 1840s to the 1930s, ed. Rodogno, Davide, Struck, Berhard, and Vogel, Jacob (New York: Berghahn, 2015), 2Google Scholar.

Ibid.

4 Heleen Murre-van Den Berg has also used local sources to analyze interactions between missionaries and local actors. See Berg, Heleen Murre-van Den, “A ‘Good and Blessed Father’: Yonan of Ada on Justin Perkins, Urmia (Iran), 1870,” in Protestant Mission and Local Encounters in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, ed. Nielssen, Hilde, Okkenhaug, Inger Marie, and Skeie, Karina Hestad (Leiden: Brill, 2011)Google Scholar.

5 During the 18th and 19th centuries male and female Catholic missionaries established a large number of churches, schools, orphanages, and hospitals in the Middle East. They encountered many of the same issues that met the Protestant missionaries, and they and their mission were similarly impacted by local encounters. See, for example, Heyberger, Bernard, Hindiyya: Mystic and Criminal, 1720–1798: A Political and Religious Crisis in Lebanon (London: James Clarke & Co. Ltd., 2013)Google Scholar.

6 See Hilde Nielssen, Inger Marie Okkenhaug, and Karina Hestad Skeie, introduction to Protestant Mission and Local Encounters, 1–22.

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 50
Total number of PDF views: 244 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-tmbpq Total loading time: 0.399 Render date: 2021-01-23T20:36:57.753Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE OTTOMAN BALKANS: EDUCATION, REFORM, AND FAILED CONVERSIONS, 1819–1967
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE OTTOMAN BALKANS: EDUCATION, REFORM, AND FAILED CONVERSIONS, 1819–1967
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

CHRISTIAN MISSIONS IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND THE OTTOMAN BALKANS: EDUCATION, REFORM, AND FAILED CONVERSIONS, 1819–1967
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *