Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

A Comparison of Four Premier Academic Law Libraries in the United States and the United Kingdom: The Findings of a Valuable International Placement

  • David Gee

Extract

Every night for ten nights last May, I returned to room 128 in the Westside YMCA (West 63rd Street, New York City — just off Central Park) armed with more behind the scenes insights, professional secrets and first hand accounts of US law library operation and management than one slim A5 notebook could hope to hold. I was fortunate to be in the United States on a two-week placement at Columbia University, visiting some of America's great law libraries — the law school libraries of Columbia itself, New York University and Yale University. Each morning after an orange juice, toasted cream cheese bagel and cappuccino, I would head out with the commuters to join the subway at Columbus Circle — uptown for Columbia or downtown for NYU. Every evening I would admire the energy of the mostly silver-haired athletes in brightly colored lycra returning to the Westside “Y” after numerous circuits of the Jackie “O” reservoir on the upper east side of Central Park. The park is 843 acres of creative space bound by impressive hotels, apartment blocks and the streets of Harlem. In May it is in perpetual motion from dawn to dusk with joggers, roller-bladers and cyclists weaving their way around the trees, fountains and numerous statues. Indeed it appears to be a huge magic garden, complete with beautiful street lamps that seem to come from C.S. Lewis's Narnia — another world, like the City itself, at once familiar and fascinatingly different.

Copyright

References

Hide All

1 W. A. F. P. STEINER, “The establishment of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies of the University of London,” IALS Bulletin, Vol.17, p. 620.

2 For more information see Steven Whittle, “Finding law in the 21st Century: an introduction to the SOSIG Law Gateway,” International Journal of Legal Information 29:2 (Summer 2001): 360.

3 For more information see Peter CLINCH, “FLAG: The new Internet gateway to foreign law holdings in UK national and University libraries,” International Journal of Legal Information 31:1 (Winter 2003): 62.

4 See David Gee and Steven Whittle, “CALIM: Current Awareness for Legal Information Managers web database,” Legal Information Management 2:3 (Autumn 2002): 55.

5 For more information see Janet Rhodes Pinkowitz, “Fee-based services at the Columbia Law School Library,” The Law Librarian 27:2 (June 1996): 88.

6 See David Gee, “Charging for information services at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Library,” The Law Librarian 30:3 (September 1999): 169.

* Reader Services Manager, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies Library, University of London, UK.

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

A Comparison of Four Premier Academic Law Libraries in the United States and the United Kingdom: The Findings of a Valuable International Placement

  • David Gee

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.