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Research Guide to Export Control and WMD Nonproliferation Law

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2019

Wei Luo
Affiliation:
Washington University School of Law Library, St. Louis, Missouri

Extract

After World War II, the non-proliferation of weapons of massive destruction (WMD) and the export controls of conventional weapons and civilian and military dual use technologies have been one of the most important focal point of international cooperation. Many international treaties have been signed and the international organizations have been established to promote these non-proliferation and export control efforts. The industrialized countries and the developing countries of China, India, and Pakistan that possess nuclear weapons and missile technologies have also enacted domestic laws and set up administrative regimes to control these goods and technologies from flowing to other countries or undesirable people. Among these countries, the United States has been the leader strongly advocating non-proliferation of WMD and export controls of civilian and military dual use goods. In fact, the United States has established a very sophisticated export control system to prevent its weapons and technologies from going to the hands of any adversaries. Because the complicities and overlaps of international treaties and domestic laws on this topic, it warrants a research guide for would-be researchers to walk through the maze of international and domestic export control regimes.

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Copyright © 2007 by the International Association of Law Libraries 

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References

1 Some data listed in Part One of this article were published in Wei Luo, A Pathfinder to U.S. Export Control Laws and Regulations (Hein, 1994). The author thanks Hein for allowing reuse of the data in this article.Google Scholar

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Import and Export (Control) Act, 1950 (Act No. XXXIX of 1950).Google Scholar

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Statutory Notification No. SRO-782 (1)/1998 prohibits export of fissionable materials.Google Scholar

Statutory Notification No.SRO-23 (1)/1999 prohibits the export of Anti-Personnel Landmines.Google Scholar

Statutory Notification No.SRO-124 (1)/1999 requires a No Objection Certificate from the Defense Ministry for export of arms, ammunitions, explosives and ingredients.Google Scholar

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