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The Human Rights Situation in Tibet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2019

Extract

It is known world-wide that there are human rights abuses in Tibet. In this paper I wish to discuss why these abuses arise, and how they can be put to an end. This will be analyzed with the help of theories laid down by Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, a Sudanese expert on human rights and international law, and Boaventura de Sousa Santos, a Portuguese expert in the sociology of law.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the International Association of Law Libraries 

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References

1 Human Rights in China, 40-47, November 1991. Beijing, Information Office of the State Council of the People's Republic of China.Google Scholar

2 Bi, X, Analysis of the Rights of National Minorities in the People's Republic of China, Lund, June 1997, at 1.Google Scholar

3 The Human Rights Yearbook at 194. Kluwer, 1994.Google Scholar

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7 Wedin, C. Tibet and Human Rights in the Perspective of Self-Determination at 25. Lund, 1996.Google Scholar

8 Supra, n.6, Pp. 1820.Google Scholar

9 Supra, note 3, Pp. 154195.Google Scholar

10 Repression in Tibet, 1987-1992. Amnesty International, People's Republic of China, ASA 17/19/92, Pp. 110, (May 1992).Google Scholar

11 Ibid.Google Scholar

12 Defying the Dragon - China and Human Rights in Tibet. LAW ASIA & Tibet Information Network, (March 1991), Pp. 721.Google Scholar

13 Heavy Prison Sentences for Nuns in Tibet, Amnesty International, People's Republic of China, ASA 17/03/94 at 1 (London, February 1994).Google Scholar

14 Guo, L, Jiaqiang Fazhi Baozhang Renquan [Strengthening Law in Order to Secure Human Rights], Pp. 17 (1995).Google Scholar

15 Henkin, L. The Human Rights in Contemporary China: A Comparative Perspective, Pp. 121. (New York, Columbia University Press, 1986).Google Scholar

16 Wang, X., Fu, Z. and Li, H., Guoji Fa [International Law], Pp. 288295. Beijing, Zhengfa Daxue Chubanshe, 1996.Google Scholar

17 Supra note 15, Pp. 17.Google Scholar

18 An-Naim, A., Human Rights in Cross-Culture Perspectives: A Quest for Consensus, Pp. 1939. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992.Google Scholar

19 Supra, note 18.Google Scholar

20 Santos, B., Toward a New Common Sense, Pp. 251370. London, Routledge, 1995.Google Scholar

21 Supra, note 14, Pp. 17.Google Scholar

22 Erasmus, G. The Extent of International Human Rights Law, in McCorquodale, R. and N. Orosz, Tibet: the Position in International Law, Pp. 4354. London: Edition Hasjörg Mayer & Serinda Publications, 1993.Google Scholar

23 This wish, to create one China, was repeated several times in press, television and on radio, during my stay in China in 1997.Google Scholar

24 Supra, note 20, Pp. 250370.Google Scholar

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