Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-5hmnr Total loading time: 0.591 Render date: 2022-10-07T20:35:13.460Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Ethical Rules and Codes of Honor Related to Museum Activities: A Complementary Support to the Private International Law Approach Concerning the Circulation of Cultural Property

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2009

Manlio Frigo
Affiliation:
State University of Milan. Email: m.frigo@ludolex.com

Abstract

The role of ethical rules and codes of conduct in the field of art law and international protection of cultural property, together with the adoption of the relevant international conventions, has constantly increased in the last decades. This article considers the main codes of conduct drafted by international organizations as well as international, national, public, and private institutions, federations, and associations. The focus is on their influence on international trade as instruments of art market regulation. Specific attention is paid to the interaction with the private international law approach and to a survey of both direct and indirect effects of these rules on the international circulation of cultural property.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Cultural Property Society 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Armbrüster, C.La revendication de biens culturels du point de vue du droit international privé.” Revue critique de droit international privé (2004): 723 ff.Google Scholar
Audit, B.Le statut des biens culturels en droit international privé français.” Revue Internationale de Droit Compare (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brodie, N. “An Archaeologist's View of the Trade in Unprovenanced Antiquities.” In Art and Cultural Heritage, Law, Policy and Practice, edited by Hoffman, B. T.. Cambridge University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Cornu, M.L'Europe des biens culturels et le marché.” Journal du Droit International (2002): 677.Google Scholar
Frigo, M.Cultural Property v. Cultural Heritage: A Battle of Concepts in International Law.” IRRC 2004, 367.Google Scholar
Frigo, M.La circolazione internazionale dei beni culturali, 2nd ed., (Giuffré), Milano, 2007.Google Scholar
Jayme, E. “L'immunité des oeuvres d'art prétées. Quelques procédures et législations récentes en Europe.” In Claims for Restitution of Looted Art, edited by Renold, M. A. and Gabus, P.. Genève, Zürich, Bâle, 2004.Google Scholar
Jayme, E.Neue Anknüpfungsmaximen für den Kulturgüterschutz im internationalen Privatrecht. Rechtsfragen des Internationalen Kulturgüterschutzes, Heidelberg: 1994.Google Scholar
Nafziger, J. A. R.The Principles for Cooperation in the Mutual Protection and Transfer of Cultural Material.” Chicago Journal of International Law 8 (2007).Google Scholar
O'Keefe, P. J.Codes of Ethics: Forms and Functions in Cultural Heritage.” International Journal of Cultural Property 7 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weller, M.Immunity for Artworks on Loan? A Review of International Customary Law and Municipal Anti-seizure Statutes in Light of the Lichtenstein Litigation.” VandJTL (2005).Google Scholar
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ethical Rules and Codes of Honor Related to Museum Activities: A Complementary Support to the Private International Law Approach Concerning the Circulation of Cultural Property
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Ethical Rules and Codes of Honor Related to Museum Activities: A Complementary Support to the Private International Law Approach Concerning the Circulation of Cultural Property
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Ethical Rules and Codes of Honor Related to Museum Activities: A Complementary Support to the Private International Law Approach Concerning the Circulation of Cultural Property
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *