Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

On the Danger of Applying Statistical Reconstruction Methods in the Case of Missing Phase Information

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 April 2016

J.C. Dainty
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Queen Elizabeth College, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH, U.K.
M.A. Fiddy
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Queen Elizabeth College, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH, U.K.
A.H. Greenaway
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Queen Elizabeth College, Campden Hill Road, London W8 7AH, U.K.
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Extract

The use of entropy as a basis for object/image reconstruction procedures is not new, but with the appearance of new, faster algorithms the actual use of these algorithms for the reconstruction of objects from ‘real’ data is likely to increase.

The purpose of this contribution is not to discourage such applications, but to illustrate that, under certain circumstances, there is a need for caution in interpreting the results obtained from such algorithms. Specifically, we shall show that the application of statistical methods to problems of object reconstruction, in situations where only the modulus of the object Fourier transform is known, could lead to wholly false conclusions. Indeed, we shall primarily be concerned here with situations for which there is no ‘correct’ solution. In such situations it is pointless to speak of ‘safe’ object reconstruction algorithms. The important point here is that the user of a statistically based ‘object reconstruction algorithm’ may be totally ignorant of whether or not he is working in this régime.

Type
Part II: Aperture Synthesis with Limited or no Phase Information
Copyright
Copyright © Reidel 1979

References

1 Frieden, B.R. : 1972, J.Opt.Soc.Am., 62, pp511518 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 Gull, S.F. and Daniell, G.J.: 1978, Nature, 272, pp686690 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Burge, R.E., Fiddy, M.A., Greenaway, A.H. and Ross, G.: 1976, Proc.Roy.Soc., A350, pp191212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Titchmarsh, E.C.: 1926, Proc.Lond.Math.Soc., 25, pp283302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Burge, R.E., Fiddy, M.A., Greenaway, A.H. and, Ross, G.: 1976 Recent Advances In Optical Physics, (ICO-10, Prague), pp 687694 Google Scholar
6 Walther, A.: 1963,Optica Acta, 10, pp4149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7 Greenaway, A.H.: 1977, Optics Lett., pp1012.Google Scholar
8 Burge, R.E., Fiddy, M.A. and Wheeler, M.W.L.: submitted to J.Mol.Biol.Google Scholar
9 Bates, R.H.T., and Napier, J.: 1972, Mon.Not.R.astr.Soc., 158, pp405424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 59 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 26th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-8ljtz Total loading time: 0.334 Render date: 2021-01-26T06:24:39.319Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

On the Danger of Applying Statistical Reconstruction Methods in the Case of Missing Phase Information
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

On the Danger of Applying Statistical Reconstruction Methods in the Case of Missing Phase Information
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

On the Danger of Applying Statistical Reconstruction Methods in the Case of Missing Phase Information
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *