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Xenotransplantation: Is the Future Upon Us?

  • Michele L. Pearson (a1), William R. Jarvis (a1), Thomas M. Folks (a2) and Louisa E. Chapman (a2)
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Hospital Infections Program, Mailstop E-69, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30333

References

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1. 1997 Annual Report of the US Scientific Registry for Transplant Recipients and the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network—Transplant Data: 1988-1994. UNOS Richmond, Virginia and the Division of Transplantation, Bureau of Health Resources Development, Health Resources and Services Administration. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services; 1997.
2. Reemstma, K. Renal heterotransplantation from nonhuman primates to man. Annals of the New York Academy of Science 1969;162:412418.
3. Michaels, MG, Simmons, RL. Xenotransplant-related zoonoses: strategies for prevention. Transplantation 1994;57:17.
4. Sachs, DH. The pig as a potential xenograft donor. Veterinary Immunity and Immunopathology 1994;43:185191.
5. Eastlund, T. Infectious disease transmission through cell, tissue, and organ transplantation: reducing the risk through donor selection. Cell Transplant 1995;4;455477.
6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Candida albicans endocarditis associated with a contaminated aortic valve allograft—California, 1996. MMWR 1997;46:261263.
7. U.S. Public Health Service. Draft public health service guideline on infectious disease issues in xenotransplantation. Federal Register 09 23, 1996;61:4992049932.

Xenotransplantation: Is the Future Upon Us?

  • Michele L. Pearson (a1), William R. Jarvis (a1), Thomas M. Folks (a2) and Louisa E. Chapman (a2)

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