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A Web-Based Course on Infection Control for Physicians in Training An Educational Intervention

  • Mohamad G. Fakih (a1) (a2), Iram Enayet (a3), Steven Minnick (a4) and Louis D. Saravolatz (a1) (a5)

Abstract

Objective.

To evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based course on infection control accessed by physicians in training.

Design.

Educational intervention.

Setting.

A 607-bed urban teaching hospital.

Participants.

A total of 55 physicians in training beginning their first postgraduate year (the iPGYl group) and 59 physicians completing their first, second, or third postgraduate year (the oPGY group).

Intervention.

Individuals in the iPGYl group took a Web-based course on infection control practices.

Measurements.

Persons in the iPGYl group who took the Web-based course completed an evaluation test consisting of 15 multiple-choice questions (total possible score, 15 points). The same test was given to persons in the oPGY group, who did not take the Web-based course. We compared scores of the Web-based test taken by subjects in the iPGYl group immediately after the course with scores of the test they took 3 months after the course and with test scores of subjects in the oPGY group.

Results.

The mean score (±SD) for subjects in the iPGYl group who took the Web-based course was 10.6 ± 2.2, compared with 8.0 ± 2.5 for subjects in the oPGY group (P<.001). The mean score (±SD) for subjects in the iPGYl group 3 months after completing the course decreased to 8.0 ± 2.4 (P< .001 by the paired f test). For the oPGY group, significant differences were found between the scores (±SD) for subjects in the internal medicine (9.9 ± 2.3), emergency medicine (8.4 ± 1.7), pediatrics (7.0 ± 1.7), and family medicine (5.8 ± 1.6) residency programs (P< .001); there were no significant differences in scores according to the year of residency.

Conclusions.

Web-based infection control courses are an attractive teaching tool for physicians in training and need to be considered for teaching infection control. The evaluation of information retention will help identify physicians in training who require further training.

Copyright

Corresponding author

St. John Hospital and Medical Center, 19251 Mack Avenue, Suite 340, Grosse Pointe Woods, MI 48236 (mohamad.fakih@stjohn.org)

References

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2. Davis, D, O'Brien, MA, Freemantle, N, Wolf, FM, Mazmanian, P, Taylor-Vaisey, A. Impact of formal continuing medical education: do conferences, workshops, rounds, and other traditional continuing education activities change physician behavior or health care outcomes? JAMA 1999; 282: 867874.
3. Mazmanian, PE, Davis, DA. Continuing medical education and the physician as a learner: guide to the evidence. JAMA 2002; 288:10571060.
4. Bell, DS, Fonarow, GC, Hays, RD, Mangione, CM. Self-study from Web-based and printed guideline material. Ann Intern Med 2000; 132:938946.
5. Cook, DA, Dupras, DM, Thompson, WG, Pankratz, VS. Web-based learning in residents' continuity clinics: a randomized, controlled trial. Acad Med 2005; 80:9097.
6. Howatson-Jones, L. Designing web-based education courses for nurses. Nurs Stand 2004; 19:4144.
7. McKimm, J, Jollie, C, Cantillon, P. ABC of learning and teaching: Web based learning. BMJ 2003; 326:870873.

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A Web-Based Course on Infection Control for Physicians in Training An Educational Intervention

  • Mohamad G. Fakih (a1) (a2), Iram Enayet (a3), Steven Minnick (a4) and Louis D. Saravolatz (a1) (a5)

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