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Surgical Site Infections at a Level I Trauma Center in India: Data From an Indigenously Developed, e-SSI Surveillance System

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2020

Ayush Lohiya
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Samarth Mittal
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Vivek Trikha
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Surbhi Khurana
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Sonal Katyal
Affiliation:
All India Institite of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Sushma Sagar
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Subodh Kumar
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Rajesh Malhotra
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
Purva Mathur
Affiliation:
All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
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Abstract

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Background: Globally, surgical site infections (SSIs) not only complicate the surgeries but also lead to $5–10 billion excess health expenditures, along with the increased length of hospital stay. SSI rates have become a universal measure of quality in hospital-based surgical practice because they are probably the most preventable of all healthcare-associated infections. Although, many national regulatory bodies have made it mandatory to report SSI rates, the burden of SSI is still likely to be significant underestimated due to truncated SSI surveillance as well as underestimated postdischarge SSIs. A WHO survey found that in low- to middle-income countries, the incidence of SSIs ranged from 1.2 to 23.6 per 100 surgical procedures. This contrasted with rates between 1.2% and 5.2% in high-income countries. Objectives: We aimed to leverage the existing surveillance capacities at our tertiary-care hospital to estimate the incidence of SSIs in a cohort of trauma patients and to develop and validate an indigenously developed, electronic SSI surveillance system. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted at a 248-bed apex trauma center for 18 months. This project was a part of an ongoing multicenter study. The demographic details were recorded, and all the patients who underwent surgery (n = 770) were followed up until 90 days after discharge. The associations of occurrence of SSI and various clinico-microbiological variables were studied. Results: In total, 32 (4.2%) patients developed SSI. S. aureus (28.6%) were the predominant pathogen causing SSI, followed by E. coli (14.3%) and K. pneumoniae (14.3%). Among the patients who had SSI, higher SSI rates were associated in patients who were referred from other facilities (P = .03), had wound class-CC (P < .001), were on HBOT (P = .001), were not administered surgical antibiotics (P = .04), were not given antimicrobial coated sutures (P = .03) or advanced dressings (P = .02), had a resurgery (P < .001), had a higher duration of stay in hospital from admission to discharge (P = .002), as well as from procedure to discharge (P = .002). SSI was cured in only 16 patients (50%) by 90 days. SSI data collection, validation, and analyses are essential in developing countries like India. Thus, it is very crucial to implement a surveillance system and a system for reporting SSI rates to surgeons and conduct a robust postdischarge surveillance using trained and committed personnel to generate, apply, and report accurate SSI data.

Funding: None

Disclosures: None

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.
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