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Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection in Hematology-Oncology Patients Colonized With Toxigenic C. difficile

  • Cara M. Cannon (a1), Jackson S. Musuuza (a2) (a3), Anna K. Barker (a1), Megan Duster (a4), Mark B. Juckett (a5), Aurora E. Pop-Vicas (a4) and Nasia Safdar (a4) (a3)...

Abstract

The prevalence of colonization with toxigenic Clostridium difficile among patients with hematological malignancies and/or bone marrow transplant at admission to a 566-bed academic medical care center was 9.3%, and 13.3% of colonized patients developed symptomatic disease during hospitalization. This population may benefit from targeted C. difficile infection control interventions.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:718–720

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Corresponding author

Address correspondence to Nasia Safdar, MD, PhD, UWMF Centennial Building, 1685 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (ns2@medicine.wisc.edu).

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PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. These data were presented in abstract form at the SHEA conference, Atlanta, Georgia on May 19, 2016.

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References

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Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection in Hematology-Oncology Patients Colonized With Toxigenic C. difficile

  • Cara M. Cannon (a1), Jackson S. Musuuza (a2) (a3), Anna K. Barker (a1), Megan Duster (a4), Mark B. Juckett (a5), Aurora E. Pop-Vicas (a4) and Nasia Safdar (a4) (a3)...

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