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Reusable blood collection tube holders are implicated in nosocomial hepatitis C virus transmission

  • Vincent C. C. Cheng (a1) (a2), Shuk-Ching Wong (a2), Sally C. Y. Wong (a1), Siddharth Sridhar (a3), Cyril C. Y. Yip (a1), Jonathan H. K. Chen (a1), James Fung (a4), Kelvin H. Y. Chiu (a1), Pak-Leung Ho (a3), Sirong Chen (a5), Ben W. C. Cheng (a5), Chi-Lai Ho (a5), Chung-Mau Lo (a6) and Kwok-Yung Yuen (a3)...
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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Kwok-Yung Yuen, Carol Yu Centre for Infection, Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. E-mail: kyyuen@hku.hk

Footnotes

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Cite this article: Cheng VCC, et al. (2019). Reusable blood collection tube holders are implicated in nosocomial hepatitis C virus transmission. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology 2019, 40, 252–253. doi: 10.1017/ice.2018.314

Footnotes

References

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1. Tsang, DNC, Ip, M, Chan, PKS, et al. Are reusable blood collection tube holders the culprit for nosocomial hepatitis C virus transmission? Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;X:XX.
2. BD vacutainer eclipse blood collection needle. Becton Dickinson website. https://www.bd.com/documents/bd-legacy/quick-guide/blood-and-urine-collection/PAS_BC-BD-Eclipse-Blood-Collection-Needle-Points-to-Practice_QG_EN.pdf. Accessed October 23, 2018.
3. VACUETTE blood collection tubes. Evacuated blood collection system for in vitro diagnostic use. Greiner Bio-One website. https://www.gbo.com/fileadmin/user_upload/Downloads/IFU_Instructions_for_Use/IFU_Instructions_for_Use_Preanalytics/English/980200_EN_rev20.PDF. Accessed October 23, 2018.
5. Campo, DS, Xia, GL, Dimitrova, Z, et al. Accurate genetic detection of hepatitis C virus transmissions in outbreak settings. J Infect Dis 2016;213:957965.
6. Widell, A, Christensson, B, Wiebe, T, et al. Epidemiologic and molecular investigation of outbreaks of hepatitis C virus infection on a pediatric oncology service. Ann Intern Med 1999;130:130134.
7. Grethe, S, Gemsa, F, Monazahian, M, Böhme, I, Uy, A, Thomssen, R. Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of HCV in a hemodialysis unit: direct sequencing of HCV-HVR1 as an appropriate tool for phylogenetic analysis. J Med Virol 2000;60:152158.
8. Garvey, MI, Bradley, CW, Holden, KL, et al. Use of genome sequencing to identify hepatitis C virus transmission in a renal healthcare setting. J Hosp Infect 2017;96:157162.
9. Girou, E, Chevaliez, S, Challine, D, et al. Determinant roles of environmental contamination and noncompliance with standard precautions in the risk of hepatitis C virus transmission in a hemodialysis unit. Clin Infect Dis 2008;47:627633.
10. Calles, DL, Collier, MG, Khudyakov, Y, et al. North Dakota Hepatitis C Virus Investigation Team. Hepatitis C virus transmission in a skilled nursing facility, North Dakota, 2013. Am J Infect Control 2017;45:126132.
11. Napoli, VM, McGowan, JE Jr. How much blood is in a needlestick? J Infect Dis 1987;155:828.
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